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Baffled
5th October 2008, 12:59 PM
I am sure that this must have been dealt with before but I beg your indulgence.

I was admiring Snaarman's 'Don't take men shopping' when I noticed it had been taken with the above lens.

By happy chance I own one which I rate highly but had no idea it could be used on the 4/3 system. Mine is an old one dating back .... well 25 years or it may be 30. Can it be the same?

Would the adapter be for a Tamron fitting or would it be for the Nikon adapter currently fitted? And are such readily available? Any suggestions where from?

Baffled.

mike_j
5th October 2008, 02:02 PM
The Tamron adaptall fitting is wonderful. It doesn't actually fit any camera system but you can fit a whole range of adaptors to it - M42 - Nikon - Minolta - Olympus etc. and the lens will work on auto aperture on an appropriate film SLR.

Secondary adaptors are avaialble for use with 4/3 cameras but all automation will be lost - no autofocus or auto aperture. On macro this hardly matters. So what you have to do is to use a Tamron to Olympus OM (Nikon Minolta, whatever) adaptor PLUS an OM (Nikon Minolta, whatever) to 4/3 adaptor.

If you are interested I have a spare Tamron to Olympus Apdaptall mount and a good quality (not Olympus) OM to 4/3 adaptor. £20 each including postage.

Baffled
5th October 2008, 05:25 PM
Mike,

Thanks for the advice and for the offer. This latter sounds attractive but I shall have to think about it. The point is that I have several Nikon lenses so that a straightforward Nikon to Olympus 4/3 adaptor might make more sense if it would work as well.

For example I have a Nikkor 50mm 1.4 that would be interesting to try also. I am not too concerned about losing automatic functions as I have, until the purchase of the E510, never used them anyway.

Would the focal lengths and effective aperture remain the same, i.e. 90mm 2.5 for the Tamron and 50mm 1.4 for the Nikkor?


Baffled

Rod Souter
5th October 2008, 05:49 PM
The aperture remains the same, however the focal length is effectively doubled.

E.g. the Nikon remains f1.4 but on a 4/3 camera its focal length is effectively 100mm.

HTH

Rod

photo_owl
5th October 2008, 10:04 PM
Mike,

Thanks for the advice and for the offer. This latter sounds attractive but I shall have to think about it. The point is that I have several Nikon lenses so that a straightforward Nikon to Olympus 4/3 adaptor might make more sense if it would work as well.

For example I have a Nikkor 50mm 1.4 that would be interesting to try also. I am not too concerned about losing automatic functions as I have, until the purchase of the E510, never used them anyway.

Would the focal lengths and effective aperture remain the same, i.e. 90mm 2.5 for the Tamron and 50mm 1.4 for the Nikkor?


Baffled


Focal lengths are focal lengths.

Aperture is aperture.

What the implications of the above are on different sensor size (or film size for that matter!) is of course a subject for hours of wonderful - and often circular) debate.

Sounds like you would benefit from a Nikon -> 4/3rds adapter in the first instance then have a good play around in A mode. You may find you need to create a mental exposure compensation chart to get the best out of your legacy glass in general use. They (all of them) tend to meter consistently but not in the regimented way the electronically mapped digital units are.
You would seem to have some of the more specialised glass that does reasonably well in practical use on digital bodies so enjoy.

snaarman
6th October 2008, 07:47 AM
Hi there folks..

Yes, we are talking about the same SP90 lens. It did come in several flavours over the years, apparently very sharp or very very sharp :-)

it looks like this...
http://e-group.uk.net/gallery/data/622/tam90.jpg (http://e-group.uk.net/gallery/showphoto.php/photo/8549)

For info, I use a cheap nikon-4/3 adapter with an adaptall-nikon in the front. This allows me to try two ranges of lenses...

BTW - I recently bought a adaptall-Konica adapter cheap on ebay. It is possible to modify the konica bayonet to work on 4/3rds. Its quite a long job but worth it in the end

Pete

snaarman
9th October 2008, 01:36 PM
I am sure that this must have been dealt with before but I beg your indulgence.

I was admiring Snaarman's 'Don't take men shopping' when I noticed it had been taken with the above lens.

By happy chance I own one which I rate highly but had no idea it could be used on the 4/3 system. Mine is an old one dating back .... well 25 years or it may be 30. Can it be the same?

Would the adapter be for a Tamron fitting or would it be for the Nikon adapter currently fitted? And are such readily available? Any suggestions where from?

Baffled.

Did you make any progress with an adapter??
I just got that beaten up Konica/Adaptall for £7 inc postage and stripped/modified/shimmed it for use on 4/3 - so now both my Tamrons are ready to go.

Pete

Baffled
9th October 2008, 03:04 PM
I have ordered a cheap one on ebay and am now awaiting delivery. I will let you know if it works in due course.

Thanks to all for their comments and help.

Baffled
15th October 2008, 03:48 PM
The Nikon - Olympus 4/3 adaptor arrived today and yes it works.

I paid 4.89 for it plus a couple of s postage and was agreeably surprised at the quality. I fitted it onto the Tamron without difficulty. The aperture ring seems rather stiff down from f8 (The Tamron SP 90 macro closes down to f32 for those who aren't familiar with the lens) but perhaps this will loosen up with use.

Focussing is easy fully open at f2.5 and pretty good up to about f8. Beyond that it is perhaps better to focus at f2.5 and then close down. I have read somewhere someone suggesting a split screen but such came as standard on my Nikons and I had replaced them with a plain screen which I much prefer. Stopping down after focussing is a bit of a pain in real close up work when distance is crucial but I suppose with a digital camera taking several shots is the answer.

I haven't carried out any real trials as today is somewhat windy (It is always windy where I live!) and as my macro work is usually carried out outdoors I couldn't be arsed to set up wind breaks etc. However a subjective judgement is that it works just fine. No trouble with infinity and within the limits imposed by the conditions it does seem that the IS system is a real boon.

Incidentally with the adaptor I also bought a screen protector for 2.60. (Postage on the two items amounted to 5.97 delivery from Hong Kong.) Again I was agreeably surprised by its quality and there seems no lack of definition with it in place. I am a little paranoid about the screen being used to having cameras wrapped in heavy leather cases so I feel much happier with that in place.

So it looks as if it is a successful move. and even if I subsequently find that there are flaws or that it only has a life span of a couple of years I can't complain at the price.

For once not completely,

Baffled.

snaarman
15th October 2008, 04:10 PM
Hi there.. That looks like a good price.. I bought mine second hand on ebay, so when I discovered the aperture ring was a bit stiff, I dismantled the tamron adapter and removed the aperture linkage, after all you won't be using it on the Olympus. That solved the problem completely..

Even with my old eyes, the SP90 does seem to snap into focus when used wide open .. great lens :)

Pete


The Nikon - Olympus 4/3 adaptor arrived today and yes it works.

I paid £4.89 for it plus a couple of £s postage and was agreeably surprised at the quality. I fitted it onto the Tamron without difficulty. The aperture ring seems rather stiff down from f8 (The Tamron SP 90 macro closes down to f32 for those who aren't familiar with the lens) but perhaps this will loosen up with use.

Focussing is easy fully open at f2.5 and pretty good up to about f8. Beyond that it is perhaps better to focus at f2.5 and then close down. I have read somewhere someone suggesting a split screen but such came as standard on my Nikons and I had replaced them with a plain screen which I much prefer. Stopping down after focussing is a bit of a pain in real close up work when distance is crucial but I suppose with a digital camera taking several shots is the answer.

I haven't carried out any real trials as today is somewhat windy (It is always windy where I live!) and as my macro work is usually carried out outdoors I couldn't be arsed to set up wind breaks etc. However a subjective judgement is that it works just fine. No trouble with infinity and within the limits imposed by the conditions it does seem that the IS system is a real boon.

Incidentally with the adaptor I also bought a screen protector for £2.60. (Postage on the two items amounted to £5.97 delivery from Hong Kong.) Again I was agreeably surprised by its quality and there seems no lack of definition with it in place. I am a little paranoid about the screen being used to having cameras wrapped in heavy leather cases so I feel much happier with that in place.

So it looks as if it is a successful move. and even if I subsequently find that there are flaws or that it only has a life span of a couple of years I can't complain at the price.

For once not completely,

Baffled.

Baffled
16th October 2008, 11:55 AM
Pete,

Can you be a bit more specific about the process of removing the aperture linkage? I hate unscrewing things in order to find out how they work as it usually results in them not.

Mechanical things and I have a long and history of things ending in tears. I nearly typed chequered history but in fact it is uniformly black.

Malcolm

snaarman
16th October 2008, 12:36 PM
Pete,

Can you be a bit more specific about the process of removing the aperture linkage? I hate unscrewing things in order to find out how they work as it usually results in them not.

Mechanical things and I have a long and history of things ending in tears. I nearly typed chequered history but in fact it is uniformly black.

Malcolm

Mmm. I know what you mean, watchmaker's screwdriver territory...

The Tamron adapter has one (or sometimes two) little tags that sneak around and attach onto the lens aperture ring. I found that the stiff aperture was caused by these. They don't do anything when it comes to a 4/3 camera so they can go. However it's a one way trip - it won't be easy to put them back.

So, its a matter of examining the construction of the adapter and a very delicate procedure to dismantle the adapter and remove the offending ring. Here is what my adaptall - nikon adapter looks like after I minimised it, if that helps.. plus a shot of the ad2/nikon/4/3 stacked adapters
http://e-group.uk.net/gallery/data/622/ad2_nikon.jpg (http://e-group.uk.net/gallery/showphoto.php/photo/8802)

And furthermore, here is an Adaptall-Konica AR that I turned into an Adaptall-4/3rd adapter
http://e-group.uk.net/gallery/data/622/ad2_konica.jpg (http://e-group.uk.net/gallery/showphoto.php/photo/8801)

Pete



Pete

Baffled
20th October 2008, 12:32 PM
On sober reflection I think I will leave the aperture linkage in place if it is tricky to re-instate. I haven't abandoned my Nikons entirely and I think it would be prudent to leave the Tamron SP90 Nikon friendly.

I can easily live with some stiffness in the operation of the ring. I am glad I asked instead of just blundering ahead. Thanks

The Adaptal-Konica modification looks interesting and I shall keep a look out for suitable lenses ..... although I am trying particularly hard not to be sidetracked into purchases at the moment as I have my eyes set on the new 9-18 mm zoom - perhaps in a years time when prices have stabilised a little. And it isn't as if I haven't already lots of new avenues to explore!!

Thanks for the advice,

Malcolm