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grumpy69
27th September 2008, 09:14 AM
We went camping at Nayburn loch near york at the last bank holiday, Sorry about the pole but I quite like these, comments good or bad welcome :D

http://i445.photobucket.com/albums/qq173/grumpy6911/P8255379.jpg

http://i445.photobucket.com/albums/qq173/grumpy6911/P8255375.jpg

Zuiko
27th September 2008, 10:10 AM
Grumpy, full marks for making the effort to capture a sunrise, this always require more dedication and planning than a sunset!

It's a good sunrise, too, but IMHO you've made the classic error of including too much foreground which, because of the massive difference in exposure values compared to the sunrise, has resulted in ugly areas of pure black containing no detail, shape or texture. In short, they add nothing to the picture but detract a lot. They simply overwhelm that superb sunrise.

A better viewpoint could have been found by walking further along the lane to where the view opened out at the end of the hedges on both sides. Hope you don't mind, but to give an idea of how the composition might have then looked, I've cropped the best image of the two you posted to this:-

http://e-group.uk.net/gallery/data/500/GRUMPY_S_PICTURE.jpg

As you can see, the area of blocked-up black is now confined to a small band at the bottom of the image, necessary to give it a baseline. The emphasis is now on the elegant silhouette of the tree that now fills the frame, set against the beautiful colours of the sunrise which have gained more prominence, too.

One small but vital detail of your image is that the brightest part of the sky where the sun has risen, or is about to rise, is partially obscurred by the distant tree on the horizon. This has two benefits, firstly it masks and reduces the area of burn-out to the point of being of little consequence and secondly it helps to prevent lens flare. Using a device like this is always a good ploy in this type of high contrast situation.

In addition to the crop, I also lightened the shadows by 7% and darkened the highlights by 25% using the Highlight/Shadows application in Elements 6, which I think achieves a better exposure balance and lends a little more definition to that splendid tree. I've also cloned out the wire and sharpened just a little.

I'm sure that by walking down the lane to the end of the hedges you could have made an even better compostition. Unless using the marvellous reflective qualities of water, Sunrise or sunset compositions often work best by keeping them simple, minimising areas that are going to merge into a solid black mass, and looking for maybe one key feature with an interesting shape that can be silhouetted as a point of interest against the colourful sky. If you live close enough to this location, it's well worth another go!

grumpy69
27th September 2008, 12:35 PM
Grumpy, full marks for making the effort to capture a sunrise, this always require more dedication and planning than a sunset!

It's a good sunrise, too, but IMHO you've made the classic error of including too much foreground which, because of the massive difference in exposure values compared to the sunrise, has resulted in ugly areas of pure black containing no detail, shape or texture. In short, they add nothing to the picture but detract a lot. They simply overwhelm that superb sunrise.

A better viewpoint could have been found by walking further along the lane to where the view opened out at the end of the hedges on both sides. Hope you don't mind, but to give an idea of how the composition might have then looked, I've cropped the best image of the two you posted to this:-

http://e-group.uk.net/gallery/data/500/GRUMPY_S_PICTURE.jpg

As you can see, the area of blocked-up black is now confined to a small band at the bottom of the image, necessary to give it a baseline. The emphasis is now on the elegant silhouette of the tree that now fills the frame, set against the beautiful colours of the sunrise which have gained more prominence, too.

One small but vital detail of your image is that the brightest part of the sky where the sun has risen, or is about to rise, is partially obscurred by the distant tree on the horizon. This has two benefits, firstly it masks and reduces the area of burn-out to the point of being of little consequence and secondly it helps to prevent lens flare. Using a device like this is always a good ploy in this type of high contrast situation.

In addition to the crop, I also lightened the shadows by 7% and darkened the highlights by 25% using the Highlight/Shadows application in Elements 6, which I think achieves a better exposure balance and lends a little more definition to that splendid tree. I've also cloned out the wire and sharpened just a little.

I'm sure that by walking down the lane to the end of the hedges you could have made an even better compostition. Unless using the marvellous reflective qualities of water, Sunrise or sunset compositions often work best by keeping them simple, minimising areas that are going to merge into a solid black mass, and looking for maybe one key feature with an interesting shape that can be silhouetted as a point of interest against the colourful sky. If you live close enough to this location, it's well worth another go!

Thanks zuico I know what you mean I have a lot to learn, its so frustrating *chr I will try harder *chr