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Chevvyf1
6th November 2013, 01:08 PM
Out at the Needles Sunday and a chap from a local Falconry was collecting funds for the rescued birds. Attracting passers by with this bird. A Buzzard - I thin he said an American ??? Buzzard. It was hard to hear as the winds were so strong we were blown back when trying to take photos of the Needles by Gusts :(

I only had the 75-300 with me on the body and the rest of my lenses were in the boot at the Car Park and I was not about to walk back to get the 60m macro, so I tried this ...

I am quite pleased with the capture.


http://e-group.uk.net/gallery/data/500/PB030620_sm.jpg (http://e-group.uk.net/gallery/showphoto.php/photo/67370)



and here is the Buzzard about to use his claws to scratch his nose ... :eek:



http://e-group.uk.net/gallery/data/500/PB030621cSM.jpg (http://e-group.uk.net/gallery/showphoto.php/photo/67371)

bigger versions for more detail on F

OM USer
6th November 2013, 01:19 PM
Wonderful shots Chevvy. I see you found some sunshine and the light levels were good (ISO 250). Would you have done better with the 60mm?

Ian
6th November 2013, 01:21 PM
Not wishing to put you off, but you have used the word 'macro' recently and your shots aren't macros at all. The ones in this thread, for example, are what I'd call bird 'portraits' or maybe close-ups. Macro is where you're showing something that is much larger than life size. I know I'm being a bit pedantic, so sorry about that but I felt it had to be said.

Ian

Olybirder
6th November 2013, 01:22 PM
Lovely shots of a beautiful bird Chevvy. I especially like the first one. The 75-300 is a very versatile lens.

Ron

Chevvyf1
6th November 2013, 01:57 PM
Wonderful shots Chevvy. I see you found some sunshine and the light levels were good (ISO 250). Would you have done better with the 60mm?

Hi Jeremy, My lens of choice, given the bird was 2ft away - would have been the 60m macro and I do or maybe did think, that lens would have given me improved detail. BUT I am not sure now !

I am so enjoying "fiddling and twiddling" and trying settings :D

Chevvyf1
6th November 2013, 02:04 PM
Not wishing to put you off, but you have used the word 'macro' recently and your shots aren't macros at all. The ones in this thread, for example, are what I'd call bird 'portraits' or maybe close-ups. Macro is where you're showing something that is much larger than life size. I know I'm being a bit pedantic, so sorry about that but I felt it had to be said.

Ian


Hi Ian, thanks for dropping by.

Don't worry your not putting me off ... :D Nor are you being pedantic at all :D

On my screen and, the Flickr images - this is much larger than life size.

I titled it "Bird macro using 75-300" ... because as I said "I only had the 75-300 with me on the body and the rest of my lenses were in the boot at the Car Park and I was not about to walk back to get the 60m macro, so I tried this ... "

More for the benefit of ONE users of whatever other lenses or potential ONE buyers - just as evidence of how very impressed I am by, the versatility of this lens and camera body. :)

Chevvyf1
6th November 2013, 02:08 PM
Lovely shots of a beautiful bird Chevvy. I especially like the first one. The 75-300 is a very versatile lens.

Ron

Thanks Ron - I was very IMPRESSED and so were the 23 CanIkons mates on the Isle of Wight photo group tour :) ... although they were "trying hard not to believe the little "toy camera" capable of this .. and they were further BLOWN away when in nanoseconds I upload these to my Samsung Tablet and edited them :) YES !

I was hoping you may know the breed ? I think the chap said American Buzzard of some sort ? it was quite pretty and like an Eagle really :)

Ian
6th November 2013, 03:29 PM
As the late great Mastermind Magnus Magnusson stated: I have started so I will finish :)

In photography the term 'macro' technically describes the recording of an image that is the same as or larger than the life size of the subject on the recording medium (sensor or film). Life size is 1:1 (subject size to image size on the film or sensor). In more recent years this term has been popularly widened unofficially to mean subjects are 'almost' or near to life size on the recording medium and even Olympus is guilty of this technical distortion with, for example, the Zuiko Digital 50mm f/2.0 Macro, which only manages half life size on the sensor - unless you fit an EX-25 extension tube. But anyway, the handsome birds of prey in this thread would have had to be a rare dwarf variety to have been the subject of macro photos seeing as the width of a Four Thirds sensor is just 17.3mm :)

Ian

IainMacD
6th November 2013, 05:55 PM
Lovely bird portraits Chevvy

dogsbody
6th November 2013, 06:45 PM
Quite pleased? just quite pleased? If that was my image I would be more than quite pleased! Super images!