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Ian
13th September 2013, 06:24 PM
http://fourthirds-user.com/galleries/data/550/P9100983.jpg (http://fourthirds-user.com/galleries/showphoto.php/photo/26800)

At the European venue for introducing the E-M1 to the press an E-M1 was placed in a lake on a tripod to show how splash proof it is. Several times a day an action photography demo sees horses and riders splash past just a few feet away. The camera is linked by wifi so to demo remote shooting capability. It's removed from the lake in the evening but put back the next day. The venue has been hired by Olympus for two weeks of demos!

Ian

Chevvyf1
13th September 2013, 07:35 PM
Nice Tripod :) strong :)

I wonder what technically is the difference between SPLASH-PROOF and Waterproof ?

Wee man
13th September 2013, 07:56 PM
One above water the order below?

snaarman
13th September 2013, 08:05 PM
About what time would it be left unattended? And how deep would the water be?

Ian
13th September 2013, 08:34 PM
Splash proof means water can be splashed on the camera and lens but you can't immerse the camera. For that it would have to be waterproof.

The schedule is for the demos to start in groups at 3pm and finish around 7.

The water is around a foot deep there.

Ian

Jetset95
13th September 2013, 08:37 PM
There was a video of the EM-5 being immersed in a waterfall and it survived that, so I'm thinking that blurs the lines a little...

Olybirder
13th September 2013, 08:38 PM
The schedule is for the demos to start in groups at 3pm and finish around 7.
Keep an eye out for Pete (Snaarman), especially if you see him wearing wellies and anxiously consulting his watch. ;)

Ron

StephenL
13th September 2013, 08:55 PM
Me and Pete are considering renting a trawler ....

Chevvyf1
13th September 2013, 09:02 PM
Me and Pete are considering renting a trawler ....

thats a good idea ... off the Isle of Skye ? :D dates ? (to book hotel )

David M
13th September 2013, 10:24 PM
Common practice for bird photographers shooting water birds. I usually try to get mine closer to the water surface even if the equipment isn't splash proof.

I discovered the built in lens hood on my OM is fairly water tight, you have to tilt the lens down to drain the water out. That's why the drainage hole in the 50-200 SWD lens hood is a good idea.

Wee man
13th September 2013, 10:32 PM
Its is not that deep in only comes half way up the swans! I tried but the horses are on guard we were told they were models.

StephenL
14th September 2013, 07:46 AM
thats a good idea ... off the Isle of Skye ? :D dates ? (to book hotel )

No, to get that camera which is sitting at the bottom of a lake. :D

pdk42
14th September 2013, 08:27 AM
I'm more intrigued by the ability of the battery to last the day rather than the camera being splash proof. Can it be woken from slumber using WiFi?

Chevvyf1
14th September 2013, 08:46 AM
Common practice for bird photographers shooting water birds. I usually try to get mine closer to the water surface even if the equipment isn't splash proof.

I discovered the built in lens hood on my OM is fairly water tight, you have to tilt the lens down to drain the water out. That's why the drainage hole in the 50-200 SWD lens hood is a good idea.

WELL I NEVER :) (I did not know that !) ... Olympus they think of EVERYTHING :cool:

Harold Gough
26th November 2014, 12:38 PM
Three days ago I had a one-off opportunity to photograph some unusual mushroom colonies. Apart from a period of three hours that day, the site was behind a tall, locked gate. It was raining, had been all morning, and did so all afternoon. My access was morning only.

It was such a dull, overcast day that focusing was, at times, rather uncertain. To get some of the shots I had to put the camera almost on the ground and focus with the rear screen tilted upwards. Towards the end of the (5 minute?) shoot, the screen stopped working and I had to use the eye-level finder.

It hadn't been raining very heavily but enough for the camera and myself to get wet. (To avoid getting other lenses in my shoulder bag wet I carried the camera wrapped in a supermarket carrier bag when not actually using it).

When I got home I wiped the camera dry with tissue and checked the rear screen. It would work only when fairly fully extended. Having recently had the body repaired because of electrical faults, I thought it was having to go back again. Fortunately, after half an hour so, full function returned to the screen. The only reasonable explanation is that a drop of water penetrated far enough to short it out.

Harold

Ralph Harwood
26th November 2014, 05:56 PM
Hi there Harold!

There has beeb talk of similar issues in dark wet conditions on the forum where the culprit has actually been drops of water on the EVF sensor fooling the camera into thinking you have put your eye to the EVF. You can switch off the EVF sensor through the menus to prove this if it happens again.

Cheers,

Ralph.

Harold Gough
27th November 2014, 06:50 AM
Hi there Harold!

There has beeb talk of similar issues in dark wet conditions on the forum where the culprit has actually been drops of water on the EVF sensor fooling the camera into thinking you have put your eye to the EVF. You can switch off the EVF sensor through the menus to prove this if it happens again.

Cheers,

Ralph.

Ralph, Thanks for the tip. Harold