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birdboy
17th August 2013, 03:43 PM
World’s Fastest AF

What does this really mean I notice that other brands are also making this claim? So who is right?

Ever since the E3 came out Olympus keep making this claim so does anyone know how Olympus test this feature in house?

This is what Olympus have said.
E3
The newly developed all point (11 point) Twin Cross Sensor provides the world’s fastest* AF as well as approximately 5 frames per second high speed rapid shooting, 1/8000 sec.

*1 Among digital SLR cameras available as of October 17, 2007. When the Olympus ZUIKO DIGITAL ED 12-60mm f2.8-4.0 SWD lens is used with the E-3 at a focal length of 60mm (120mm; 35mm equivalent). Based on Olympus' in-house measurement conditions.

E5
World's Fastest*2 AF Makes Sure You Capture the Image You Want

*1. Among digital SLR cameras available as of September 14, 2010. When the Olympus ZUIKO DIGITAL ED 12-60mm f2.8-4.0 SWD lens is used with the E-5 at the telephoto end (at a focal length equivalent to 120mm of 35mm camera). Based on Olympus' in-house measurement conditions.

*2. In-house testing

From the Zuiko 12-60swd literature
Autofocusing is powered by Olympus’s breakthrough SWD. Developed as the “world’s fastest AF system”, this extraordinary autofocusing drive provides both high speed and high precision while operating with lower noise than ever.

E-M5
FAST AF
Even Faster. Even More Accurate. Capture the Instant with the World's Fastest* AF.

*Among digital cameras with interchangeable lenses available as of February 8, 2012, when using the OLYMPUS M. ZUIKO DIGITAL ED 12-50mm F3.5-6.3 EZ lens with the E-M5, based on Olympus in-house measurement conditions.

No World’s fastest claim made with this lens. No swd so has the linear drive overtaken the swd, if so why get FT glass to work with MFT.

In house testing, what does this mean? So does Olympus buy all brands of digital camera with interchangeable lenses and test in-house. I find this hard to believe. Is there some legal scam in that the comparison has to be made with a specific lens? Since there were no other brands of FT bodies on the market it may have held true. Now there are other brand mFT bodies the comparison would have to be made using the specific lens on another brand mFT body. To me this has the appearance of miss-selling. What the customer wants to buy is the World’s fastest autofocusing camera on the market.

So Olympus claims that the E-M5 is faster than the E5!

So how would you setup a representative test. Lens at infinity, good light, subject static or moving, distance from subject, SAF or CAF. We are being told that it is the focusing speed that is being measured. Is that the time from when you press the shutter and the focus lock light comes up?

The feedback from this forum appears to be saying that the E-M5 is not the World’s fastest AF, it is not as fast as the E5 for BIF as an example. There has been a steady stream of loyal Olympus users jumping ship particularly when their needs are fast AF for BIF / action shots. They seem to be going to Canikon.

I just hope that when Olympus market their next generation of products they tame their claims to something that us folk can properly understand and is truly the World’s fastest. That’s a very brave claim.

How do you interpret World’s fastest AF and is it important to you?

John

Zuiko
17th August 2013, 03:51 PM
I think the claim was based upon testing SAF in optimum conditions. It did slow somewhat in relation to some of the competition when light levels dropped and CAF was never quite as good. The real point was that Olympus at last had a comparable AF system to the big boys which, in certain conditions, even outperformed them.

birdboy
17th August 2013, 04:00 PM
What would be interesting is to know what were those certain conditions.

David Morison
17th August 2013, 04:23 PM
Under the real world conditions I use everyday I can't tell any difference, using SAF on static or slow moving subjects, between EM5, E5, E30 and Canon 7D and I have taken thousands of images on all of them. For BIFs (CAF tracking) however the Canon wins hands down as it is fast and very accurate, the E5 is quite a way behind as it will hunt a bit and give less accurate results, the E30 is very similar to the E5 but the EM5 is pretty unusable unless the subject is around for a long time to enable many attempts at locking on accurately - and that's with M4/3 glass!

David

birdboy
17th August 2013, 04:52 PM
That's very much what I thought and I am sure that between the 7D and E5 there would be a Nikon.

This claim of World's fastest matters to me. It was why I came to FT and the E3 back in 2008. I had at that time an Olympus c765UZ interestingly an EVF and I could not get BIF at all. I scanned the market for fast AF. I brought what I thought was the World's fastest AF DSLR, that’s what Olympus said and I thought it was a brand to be trusted. Maybe I was naive and I know so much more now that such statements need to carefully qualified.

Zuiko
17th August 2013, 06:57 PM
That's very much what I thought and I am sure that between the 7D and E5 there would be a Nikon.

This claim of World's fastest matters to me. It was why I came to FT and the E3 back in 2008. I had at that time an Olympus c765UZ interestingly an EVF and I could not get BIF at all. I scanned the market for fast AF. I brought what I thought was the World's fastest AF DSLR, that’s what Olympus said and I thought it was a brand to be trusted. Maybe I was naive and I know so much more now that such statements need to carefully qualified.

I'm sure that Olympus aren't the only company guilty of a little selective representation when it comes to marketing claims. They were not inaccurate with this claim but in the interests of veracity maybe they should have qualified it in a little more detail at the time. That's not to say the CAF on the E-3 is deficient, just that it's not quite the best performer of its time in this respect.

David M
17th August 2013, 07:12 PM
Anyone wanting to photograph BIF should buy a Canikon, it doesn't matter which or what model.

Ulfric M Douglas
17th August 2013, 07:20 PM
S-AF of every single Olympus DSLR I've ever tried is very fast with whatever lens I've tried.
I'm sure that at a certain moment in time the 12-60 at 50mm focused as fast as any other DSLR with any other lens.
No toothpaste whitens whiter!
No other spot cream is more effective!

Actually plenty of entry-level DSLRs with entry-level kit lenses focus abominably slowly ... I was shocked at the latest Nikons myself ... just go into PCworld one time ...

Olympus lenses are the business.

birdboy
17th August 2013, 09:35 PM
Anyone wanting to photograph BIF should buy a Canikon, it doesn't matter which or what model.

But it matters which lenses. I do agree that for BIF Canikon is the answer. That's what I think right now and if only I knew a bit more back in 2008. In some respects I regret having brought into the FT system but its size, weight and lenses at efl 400mm at f3.5 still seems to me a winning combo especially for travel. If only FT could be revived, fingers crossed.

birdboy
17th August 2013, 09:41 PM
S-AF of every single Olympus DSLR I've ever tried is very fast with whatever lens I've tried.
I'm sure that at a certain moment in time the 12-60 at 50mm focused as fast as any other DSLR with any other lens.
No toothpaste whitens whiter!
No other spot cream is more effective!

Actually plenty of entry-level DSLRs with entry-level kit lenses focus abominably slowly ... I was shocked at the latest Nikons myself ... just go into PCworld one time ...

Olympus lenses are the business.

I accept that but no one makes the claim that their toothpaste is the World's whitest or their spot cream is the World's most effective.

It is the use of the word World's best that I find very miss-leading.

yes I agree Olympus lenses are the bis so why would a company appear to not support the bodies that can maximise on their potential (Zuiko FT lenses)

Imageryone
17th August 2013, 09:49 PM
https://encrypted-tbn3.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcQXlDwUlk8GvAQExpYmTX2JvvYhIt_sS nT2ma7SaqoyN8-4Tstvkg

All you need to take Birds in Flight, the old way.

birdboy
17th August 2013, 09:57 PM
https://encrypted-tbn3.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcQXlDwUlk8GvAQExpYmTX2JvvYhIt_sS nT2ma7SaqoyN8-4Tstvkg

All you need to take Birds in Flight, the old way.

What is that:eek: something from the Charles Darwin finch collection!

David M
17th August 2013, 10:21 PM
If you're shooting Canikon lens choice doesn't matter.

Imageryone
17th August 2013, 10:27 PM
What is that:eek: something from the Charles Darwin finch collection!

I think it is actually Royal Flying Core camera gun from the first World War , used in the old biplanes, but I will confirm during tomorrow :) and , despite what my friends say, I am not old enough to have used one :D:D:D

Zuiko
17th August 2013, 10:34 PM
https://encrypted-tbn3.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcQXlDwUlk8GvAQExpYmTX2JvvYhIt_sS nT2ma7SaqoyN8-4Tstvkg

All you need to take Birds in Flight, the old way.

Is the idea that you shoot the bird first (literally) so that it's no longer moving when you photograph it? :D