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View Full Version : Heads up - wobbly OMD tripod mount


jdal
18th July 2013, 10:50 AM
I had a moan on a while back about getting a simple tripod QR plate fitted firmly to the tripod bush, and ended up with felt pads on the plate to stop it wobbling. I've since had to send the camera in for repair because of a knackered LCD, and I mentioned the QR plate problem on the repair sheet. Oly have replaced the entire back cover and now the cheapo plate fits perfectly. :)

I just mention this in case anyone else has this problem and thinks that they have a crappy QR plate, make sure the bush & screws are flush with the camera base.

StephenL
18th July 2013, 11:13 AM
Thanks for this.

Just checked mine and it's fine, but worth knowing about.

Ulfric M Douglas
18th July 2013, 04:50 PM
Very useful post.

David Morison
18th July 2013, 05:36 PM
I have several Arca style QR plates and only one will fit the OMD tripod bush properly as the screws are too long - another consequence of miniaturisation. Incidentally it's the cheapest one that works!
David

jdal
18th July 2013, 06:30 PM
I have several Arca style QR plates and only one will fit the OMD tripod bush properly as the screws are too long - another consequence of miniaturisation. Incidentally it's the cheapest one that works!
David

I ground the end off the screw on my plate for this reason.

stonehollow
20th October 2013, 11:25 PM
I have the same problem. The tripod socket appears to be loose in the body (moves). I'll be contacting Olympus repair next :(.

bilbo
21st October 2013, 06:58 AM
In case anybody is wondering about the E-M1, my Manfrotto (Metal, 190 X-PRO) plate fits my EM-1 just fine.

brian1208
21st October 2013, 07:13 AM
mine too Brian

jdal
21st October 2013, 07:38 AM
I splashed out on a RRS plate for the E-M5, it's heavier and dearer than I'd like but is absolutely solid and protects the base of the camera marvellously. I hope they make them for future OMD bodies.

drmarkf
21st October 2013, 07:39 AM
The Kirk PZ-130 plate (Arca-Swiss) fits both the M5 and M1 perfectly

http://www.wexphotographic.com/buy-kirk-pz-130-quick-release-universal-camera-plate-for-compact-system-cameras/p1533941

The screw's not too long and the lip at the rear engages perfectly with the back of the body without obstructing the screen movement.

Gwyver
21st October 2013, 03:21 PM
I use a RRS model B9 plate (the basic square version) with my E-M5 and the lip engages with the back of the body. It works fine and doesn't interfere with the LCD rotation.

David M
21st October 2013, 11:09 PM
I think I've got a B9 somewhere, I'm assuming they haven't redesigned the plate as mine dates back to the mid 90's.

stonehollow
16th December 2013, 02:45 AM
I have the RRS plate, but if your tripod tips over with a relatively heavy lens setup (50 mm macro, MMF-3 and adapter), bad things will happen.
http://myrabo.com/4images/details.php?image_id=10
http://myrabo.com/4images/details.php?image_id=10

$10 USD, 10 minute fix.
http://myrabo.com/4images/details.php?image_id=10

Ricoh
7th October 2014, 01:24 PM
Can someone please advise the tripod thread size required for the OMD E-M5. (Unless I'm mistaken I can't see it identified in the full electronic version of the user manual.)
Internet browsing says its 1/4 20 thread, but then another search said it was 3/8 16 !!

Reading the above thread it becomes apparent the thread length is critical, unless I want to make spacers.
Many thanks.

Gwyver
7th October 2014, 04:06 PM
Steve,
It is definitely 1/4 20 thread

Ricoh
7th October 2014, 04:13 PM
Thanks Chris.
Cheers!

jdal
7th October 2014, 04:45 PM
I've got a proper BOEM5 RRS plate for the E-M5 and there's STILL a bit of movement between the plate & camera.

Ricoh
7th October 2014, 05:30 PM
What do you put that down to, camera or head/plate? (Just googled, so understand its a grip)

I've just ordered a Giottos MH7002-652 head, hope it interfaces ok without any slop.

jdal
7th October 2014, 05:40 PM
It's got me stumped, I was thinking of sending it of to Luton Cameras to see if they can do anything. It doesn't actually wobble, it just kind of bends, but the plate is very solid. I've tried a shorter screw to make sure it isn't the screw bottoming out.

Ricoh
7th October 2014, 05:44 PM
You've tried other QR plates have you, Giottos, Manfrotto etc?
If both the camera base plate and grip are true, and the screw form and length are correct, then you are right to be 'stumped'.

You could try 'engineer's blue' to see if there are any highs.

jdal
7th October 2014, 09:02 PM
I just wonder if the tripod bush assembly in the camera projects slightly more than it should, or maybe has a bit of play in it.

Ricoh
7th October 2014, 09:09 PM
A straight edge will inform whether that's the case - which I'm sure you've done already.

Have you checked whether there's mobility in the bush, you could torque a screw reacting against a clearance washer to observe what's going on with the bush insert.

Ricoh
7th October 2014, 09:11 PM
The screw isn't bottoming is it?

jdal
7th October 2014, 10:05 PM
I think the female screw bush projects ever so slightly from the lavel of the base if the assembly. The two screws which hold it in place project very slightly, but the RRS plate has corresponding depressions to accommodate these. I need to look at another E-M5 I think, it may be that I'm just expecting too much

Ricoh
7th October 2014, 10:17 PM
Just checked my E-M5. The tripod bush is held in place by a plate with two fasteners approx 180 diagonally from each other. Running a straight edge I can see that the bush assembly is clear of the 12 pads, 6 either side of the bush. These in turn are level with the two lateral raised sections.
Suggest you cross check with my observations.

Ricoh
7th October 2014, 10:28 PM
If there's enough contrast between the dark plastic of the grip and engineer's blue, I would apply the witness blue to the rib sections of the E-M5 base plate, assemble, torqued to normal (whatever that is), disassemble and inspect. It may show better under a near UV light. Some of the LED light sources run close to the blue end of the spectrum.

Ricoh
7th October 2014, 10:49 PM
Further to my last post, there are 4 off 1mm pads, 2 at each end of the camera (not quite symmetrical, as those on the battery compartment are set inboard). These are level with the pads and lateral ribs. (It's what you would expect, it would be costly to produce a base plate that is flat overall.) The sum of these are set higher than the bush assembly.

peak4
7th October 2014, 11:57 PM
Personally I've made my own Arca style plates and clamps. I've padded the plates with some very thin car/engine gasket material stuck on with double sided tape or superglue.
It's probably less than 1mm thick and composed of compressed cork and rubber granules in sheet form. Any decent engineering supplier should be able to assist, though mine has some by the square meter from steam rallies or car shows.
It makes the plates non slip and also absorbs any imperfections on the base of the camera bodies.
Does the job a treat and looks the part too.

jdal
8th October 2014, 07:28 AM
Further to my last post, there are 4 off 1mm pads, 2 at each end of the camera (not quite symmetrical, as those on the battery compartment are set inboard). These are level with the pads and lateral ribs. (It's what you would expect, it would be costly to produce a base plate that is flat overall.) The sum of these are set higher than the bush assembly.
Yes, i noted those. For whatever reason the RRS plate has depressions to accommodate these also.

I may have an email chat with RRS on this, they have obviously tailored their clamp in a very detailed way.

Thanks for all the assistance.

jdal
8th October 2014, 07:29 AM
Bill,

Something along those lines is a possibility. Cheers

drmarkf
8th October 2014, 10:59 AM
Some time ago I gave up on Manfrotto plates with cork washers because of wobble with heavy bodies and lenses: personally I'd be a bit cautious of placing anything less than rigid between body and plate.

For what its worth, I've found the Kirk universal CSC plate to be an extremely secure fit on both the E5 and E1:
http://www.wexphotographic.com/buy-kirk-pz-130-quick-release-universal-camera-plate-for-compact-system-cameras/p1533941

It doesn't foul the tilt screen, and there's a shallow lip that locks behind the rear of the body.

Obviously if you've got a rogue baseplate with a protruding socket then you'd better get that sorted first.

jdal
8th October 2014, 07:31 PM
Pardon my non engineering english here!

Here's an image of the RRS plate and the base of the camera and an image of a straight edge across the tripod bush, going where the yellow line is on the 1st image.

http://e-group.uk.net/gallery/data/776/Q9070015.jpg (http://e-group.uk.net/gallery/showphoto.php/photo/78183)

http://e-group.uk.net/gallery/data/776/Q9070017.jpg (http://e-group.uk.net/gallery/showphoto.php/photo/78184)

The camera base has a slightly raised rectangular platform containing the bush, held in place by two screws (A) and surrounded by parallel raised ridges which are the same height as the platform (B). The second image shows that the bush actually projects beyond the level of the raised ridges, the two screws do this also.

Looking at the RRS plate in the 1st picture, it seems obvious to me that it is engineered to sit flush with the base, since all the raised ridges and dots on the base correspond with shallow recesses on the plate. Also the two screws holding in the bush assembly have corresponding recesses, as though RRS have a spec which says the screws will stick out a bit. There is no recess which corresponds to the projecting bush.

I think it's wobbling because the bush sticks out a bit and there isn't a recess on the plate for it. The question is, is it the camera that's wrong? Re-reading Ricoh's posts, it looks as if it's the camera that's wrong.

Do people agree I'm reading this right? If so

Ricoh
8th October 2014, 07:51 PM
John, on my EM5 the tripod bush and two screws you've labeled A are sub-flush of the raised ribs marked B. There are further pads at either end of the camera which are planar with the pads.
Turning to the RRS plate, I think what I'm seeing is the end of a fastener (the 'tripod screw') and another a hole in the 1 o'clock position. Is that to accommodate different cameras by changing the position of the screw?
Looking at the 2nd picture, you need to use a good quality straight edge (I used a steel rule on edge, but a plastic one should suffice) and run it diagonally across the raised pads to check the straight edge clears the bush, holder and screws.
Let me know how you get on.

peak4
8th October 2014, 07:53 PM
John, just had a straight edge on mine; the stainless bush does protrude slightly, to the tune of 2 thou measured with a feeler gauge.
That would be enough to give a detectable wobble.
It does look like the large recess on your plate isn't quite deep enough to accommodate the variation between different camera bodies.
I'd not really noticed the issue myself as my DIY plate is padded slightly.

Ricoh
8th October 2014, 08:12 PM
Just shows the build tolerance, on mine a steel straight edge sails over the bush and screws. Turning the ruler, it's the same, i.e. the 6" seems to be reasonably true.
Interestingly the plastic moulding has cut outs to clear the end pads -why I wonder. It would be better to have point contacts.

Ricoh
8th October 2014, 08:15 PM
John, just had a straight edge on mine; the stainless bush does protrude slightly, to the tune of 2 thou measured with a feeler gauge.
That would be enough to give a detectable wobble.
It does look like the large recess on your plate isn't quite deep enough to accommodate the variation between different camera bodies.
I'd not really noticed the issue myself as my DIY plate is padded slightly.
On yours is it just the bush, or are the two fasteners to the bush housing protruding too?

Ricoh
8th October 2014, 08:24 PM
How thick is the RRS plastic plate? Can you take a dermal to it, relieving 'carefully' where there's an interference (possibly unscrew the bush holder to form a template for marking the plastic).

jdal
8th October 2014, 08:47 PM
Steve,

Thanks for taking the time out to do this. The RRS plate is closely tailored to the E-M5, the camera is a snug fit into it. The extra hole is a tripod screw mount in line with the lens, so you can mount the E-M5 on a non-arco tripod with the base on.

It is a bit unusual, they seem to be trying to have a close contact with the camera base - no idea why. I've mailed them to see what they say - they're pretty good with techo type queries.

In the absence of anything else I'm tempted to grind a bit off the bush, but I'm not sure if that's a good idea. Or the best way to go about it.

peak4
8th October 2014, 08:58 PM
On yours is it just the bush, or are the two fasteners to the bush housing protruding too?

Just the bush

jdal
8th October 2014, 09:06 PM
Bush and fasteners on mine.

Ricoh
8th October 2014, 09:15 PM
If the two diagonal screws are removed, does it remove the bush holder complete with bush. I wonder if the bush can be reset? I don't want to experiment with mine for obvious reasons :)
Personally I would not modify the camera, i.e. grind the bush, but look for a work-around to the RSS plate, or find an alternative.
As you can see, this sort of thing interests me, even though by training I'm an electronics engineer.

Ricoh
8th October 2014, 09:24 PM
Bush and fasteners on mine.
Based on a small sample (three) there's quite a variation: sub flush, bush slightly proud and yours with screws and bush sitting high.
Is the RRS thing expensive (all relative of course)? If you want to modify, and having marked the high points, you could take a hot soldering iron to gently remould the area. I say could, not do :)

jdal
8th October 2014, 09:33 PM
Based on a small sample (three) there's quite a variation: sub flush, bush slightly proud and yours with screws and bush sitting high.
Is the RRS thing expensive (all relative of course)? If you want to modify, and having marked the high points, you could take a hot soldering iron to gently remould the area. I say could, not do :)

The RRS plate is a very good quality metal plate, so I'd have to grind it away. Grinding the camera's bits would damage the 2nd hand value of he camera maybe, but with a tripod mount that doesn't work very well, and a base plate that ls pretty scratched already that may not actually be true.

I'll get back to this thread if RRS reply to my enquiry.

drmarkf
8th October 2014, 10:49 PM
Just the bush

I've just checked mine, and it's like this.
My M1's packed away for a trip with a Cotton Carrier handstrap mounted, plus its a bit late, but I'll get it out and check that tomorrow.

Weird.

Ulfric M Douglas
9th October 2014, 04:04 PM
I would make a black cardboard gasket (2mmish) with an oblong cutout large enough for the bushing and sub-plate that are the problem.
The camera base would sit flat on the gasket which sits flat on the arca plate.
I could gently glue it to the plate if required.

jdal
9th October 2014, 06:51 PM
Cheers Ulfric.

RRS have passed my query on to their engineers, I'll see what they say first.

drmarkf
9th October 2014, 08:19 PM
My M1 seems flush, or as near as dammit. The Kirk plate locks securely to both, it must be said.

David M
9th October 2014, 09:50 PM
Until RRS get back to you try a piece of thin insulation tape (electrical tape over here) either side of the tripod socket.

Ricoh
9th October 2014, 10:54 PM
Whatever you use it needs to be incompressible; if you want to go the Heath Robinson route, consider the clear stiff plastic packaging found on the front of many goods (usually has cardboard rear, such as razor packs etc). Plastic is approx 1mm, easy to cut and won't compress under the loads your going to apply.