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paullus
22nd June 2013, 07:57 AM
Yesterday my wife and I returned from a two week holiday near to Nerja on the Costa Del Sol, Spain. We both took our cameras, my E5 and her Nikon D7000. One of the places we visited was the Nerja caves. We took both cameras and I must admit to expecting to struggle with the low light and the fact that use of flash was forbidden. I set the E5 with 12-60 fitted to Program mode with Auto ISO and WB. Not very technical I know but I wanted the simplest settings to hopefully get some shots. The caves as expected were dimly lit with not a great deal of contrast. The E5 is going to struggle here I thought. However much to my delight and complete surprise it never faltered. On the rare occasion focus lock could no be achieved I just moved to a different area on the subject and was able to get lock. The Nikon however was a complete waste of time. We spent some time trying various modes and settings but it was very reluctant to get focus lock despite built-in focus assist lamp. In the end my wife was forced to gave up with it and just carried it around. I must admit to feeling very slightly smug. I happily took dozens of shots of beautiful stalagmites, stalactites and other rock formations in an environment where I had doubted the wisdom of even taking the E5.
I also used my EC-14 with the 12-60 and 70-300 lenses quite a bit too during the fortnight. I haven't had time to view any of the results properly on my PC yet. The EC-14 with 70-300 0n full zoom hand held was a real challenge and big test for the I.S. I will upload some of the results providing they are suitable and I haven't shouted my mouth off prematurely.
Cheers,
Steve

Jim Ford
22nd June 2013, 09:38 AM
Interesting that the E5 blew away the much vaunted mighty Nikon D7000!

Subscribers on the Olympus SLR forum on the dpreview site would be very interested to hear of your experience, as the E5 is often compared unfavourably to the D7000.

Jim

Glee
22nd June 2013, 12:57 PM
Compared unfavourably by those who have never used one and their knowledge comes from "impartial reviews"

paullus
22nd June 2013, 01:51 PM
I have chance now to peruse the holiday snaps and I can say absolutely that my E5 set to simply point and shoot on auto settings has blown the Nikon away. Of the shots my wife took in the caves most were blurred. The Nikon was also set to Program mode and later I manually upped the to ISO to 1000 in a vain attempt to improve matters.
Overall looking at all of the holiday pictures there were not many shots from the Nikon that looked as sharp and vibrant as the Oly. I know I'm talking to the converted here but some of the shots were of the same subject taken from a slightly different viewpoint but with stark differences.
I'll make a selection for comparative purposes and upload them.
Cheers,
Steve

Jim Ford
22nd June 2013, 04:52 PM
I wish you'd post this on the Olympus SLR forum on the dpreview site I mentioned earlier. Mind you if you do, you'll get a flood of outrage from the Nikon lurkers. It'll certainly create a furore!

Jim

Glee
22nd June 2013, 05:11 PM
We should be nice, you will only make the Nikon users feel insecure about the size of their cameras :-)

Jim Ford
22nd June 2013, 06:13 PM
We should be nice, you will only make the Nikon users feel insecure about the size of their cameras :-)

My point is that dpreview gave the D7000 a score of 80% with a silver rating, whereas the E5 only got 75%.

The truth ought to be told!

Jim

David M
22nd June 2013, 06:28 PM
I suspect DPR ratings are only a guide to how good a camera is at taking thousands of shots or your cat or dog.

Glee
22nd June 2013, 06:44 PM
I saw "that impartial review",it is always the case that people are more willing to believe what they need to be true rather than what is actually true, bias is part of the human condition. I would agree that the review skewed and should be challenged.

I am a recovering ex Nikon user who has moved to olympus m4/3. I have previosuly owned a 7000 and had the use of a E5 for a weekend via my brother who rather than argue let me try. The E5 felt much better in the hand, build quality and handling and really made me thing about my approach to photography, I went with the m4/3 and Olympus based on the E5 experience and the fact a second hand d7000 sail value is a long way short of an E5 kit.

I have long stopped worrying about my gear and concentrate on my photography. I am still regularly surprised how well my EP3 performs, and my EM5 blows me away. Nikon D7000, yes I think I remember you. :-)

Ulfric M Douglas
22nd June 2013, 07:32 PM
I have a little experience of the D7000 with various lenses taking tourist snaps of people, parks and trains and I almost always prefer Jpegs from the Olympii.
The Nikon files seem to require processinf from RAW to properly compete in colours and contrast and 'niceness' ... what file format were you using for yours Steve?

sponner
23rd June 2013, 12:50 AM
I have used a D7000 and, overall, I do prefer the E5 but that is probably more to do with the lenses I had available.

The Oly jpeg colours are great but shooting in RAW kind of negates this advantage, I love the results I am getting from my D800 too.

It's far too easy to get hung up on camera brands, I suspect most good DSLR's are capable of great photo's most of the time, its just that some excel in certain areas.

I don't think low light performance is a strong point of the E5, it does generate too much noise at higher ISO's.

I'm not saying you cannot get good, useable shots in low light just that there are better tools for that situation. I found the D7000 a lot better in low light than the E5, the D800 is better again.

For me the strength of the E5 is its build quality, lenses (hg, I can only dream about how good the shg ones must be), in built stabilisation and the 2x crop factor for reach in reasonable light.

With the 12-60 and 50-200 and a 1.4 tc I get 24-560mm coverage. How much would that cost on a full frame canikon with good quality lenses? Its not a massively bulky kit either.

IamFisheye
23rd June 2013, 10:38 AM
You say the E-5 was better in poor lighting than the D7000. You are using a camera with built in IS and one of the best standard zooms on the market (for it's time). You haven't said what lens your wife was using on the D7000 and whether it was a VR lens or how bright it is wide open.

What kind of focal lengths and apertures do you have to compare between the two systems? I recall seeing an AF speed comparison between a NIkon D300 and an E-3 when they were both new on the market. The E-3 was faster but only at the wide (12mm) end, which I imagine was down to the F2.8 aperture.

Another factor maybe familiarity with your gear, how long have you had the two cameras and how often do you use them? I tend to not use parts of my gear for long periods, especially with heavy glass, but I do look ahead when I'm planning a trip and try and practice for some of those situations I may encounter. i.e. I'm going on a Safari in September and I've just dusted off the E-3, EC-14 and 50-200mm*, been out this morning and taken some awful shots of one of my dogs chasing rabbits over the fields behind our house. It's about as close as rural Essex gets to a savannah. Hopefully I will have my panning up to scratch by the time I go away.

Paul

*Sponner I've been researching FF for the range you mention. Heavy on the pocket as well as heavy on the back (not to mention carry on flight restrictions). I've been looking at the D700 or D800, sigma 120-300mm f2.8 and tele converters for the safari. To be honest I'd sooner spend the money on another trip and use what I have. Maybe upgrade to a used E-30 or E-5 and rent a 150mm F2

Jim Ford
23rd June 2013, 12:05 PM
You are using a camera with built in IS and one of the best standard zooms on the market (for it's time).

Interesting comment. So what's the best standard zoom on the market at the current time, that outclasses the 12-60mm Zuiko?

Jim

sponner
23rd June 2013, 12:06 PM
If I was going on a safari (lucky you) I wouldn't take teh d800, even if I had the appropriate lenses available.

The stuff you read about it being unforgiving on technique, eating memory cards etc are true.

I would be more than happy to take the E5, 50-200 + TC, that would be the perfect set up without spending next years safari money (which I haven't got anyway :) )

IamFisheye
23rd June 2013, 01:18 PM
Interesting comment. So what's the best standard zoom on the market at the current time, that outclasses the 12-60mm Zuiko?

Jim

Jim, I don't know, probably still the 12-60mm ;-) I was just anticipating some smart alec coming back with ah but the CanikonSonySigma xx-yymm is far better these days. I just recall when it came out it won an award, lens of the year or similar.

paullus
23rd June 2013, 02:44 PM
You say the E-5 was better in poor lighting than the D7000. You are using a camera with built in IS and one of the best standard zooms on the market (for it's time). You haven't said what lens your wife was using on the D7000 and whether it was a VR lens or how bright it is wide open.


Another factor maybe familiarity with your gear, how long have you had the two cameras and how often do you use them?


Hi Paul.

I bought my E5 to replace my E3 in February 2011 after working up through the range of Oly DSLRs from an E500 bought in 2005.
My Wife's Nikon D7000 was bought in April 2011 and it is fitted with the kit AF-S DX 18-105 f3.5-5.6 ED VR lens. This is her first DSLR but she uses it frequently and gets good results.
Neither of us have had any photographic training we learn through trial and error. I have no doubt that in more experienced hands the Nikon may have performed better. As I was at pains to point out both cameras were set as closely to point and shoot as possible in program mode. (My wife didn't use the auto setting because of the chance that the flash would pop up and she didn't feel inclined to trawl through the menu to turn auto pop-up off). The thinking behind this was to allow the camera not the user to do the work and hopefully get some decent shots to record our visit. However under these conditions the Nikon performed poorly in that it rarely achieved focus lock whereas the E5 did!

Steve

Jim Ford
23rd June 2013, 05:06 PM
Jim, I don't know, probably still the 12-60mm ;-) I was just anticipating some smart alec coming back with ah but the CanikonSonySigma xx-yymm is far better these days. I just recall when it came out it won an award, lens of the year or similar.

dpreview said that it was a superb lens that was up there with the very best. I asked because you seemed to imply that the lens was outdated and you knew of better ones!

Jim