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DekHog
30th May 2013, 06:10 PM
I'm just trying to get back into my photography after a hectic year at work and being away from home most of the time - I've been visiting my usual forums, and notice that on DPR the current popular theme/gripe/moan for the OM-D is shutter shock.

Is it just me, or do some people need to get a life and just get out there and take more pictures rather than constantly 'testing' what they have to see what faults they can find? :D

Zuiko
30th May 2013, 06:28 PM
I'm just trying to get back into my photography after a hectic year at work and being away from home most of the time - I've been visiting my usual forums, and notice that on DPR the current popular theme/gripe/moan for the OM-D is shutter shock.

Is it just me, or do some people need to get a life and just get out there and take more pictures rather than constantly 'testing' what they have to see what faults they can find? :D

Yes, I've seen debates about "shutter shock" on other forums. However, it is not something that I have personally experienced therefore so far as I'm concerned it does not exist! :D

Some people are consumed by the need to test their cameras to the nth degree and some are even very good at it. Shame that invariably they are cr*p photographers who would generally never take a decent snap in their entire life, if they had one! :rolleyes:

StephenL
30th May 2013, 06:48 PM
Never even heard of sh*tter shock! Just shows how naive I am! But yes, some people must spend their hobby looking for faults or photographing test charts.

cariadus
30th May 2013, 07:09 PM
Never heard of it either. I shall remain in blissful ignorance, I think!

brian1208
30th May 2013, 07:34 PM
It exists (just as Mirror Slap used to occur under some conditions with film 35mm cameras and DSLR's - which is why mirror lock-up was invented) and if you work with particular lenses / bodies at certain shutter speeds it can be encountered

As a retired scientist I was interested enough to do a statistical analysis of over 1000 images and confirmed a slightly skewed peak of blurred images at round /80th - 1/100th with tails at around 1/60th and 1/160th (I can shoot at 1/13th sec and see no blur at all so its a narrow band where the effect may be seen)

BUT

that doesn't make it a "Problem", merely a characteristic of certain combinations of lens / body / operator (people with "Soft" hand-holding technique seem less likely to see it than those who have a firmer, more rigid grip)

Once known about it never arises again as one avoids those regions where it may be seen

(Its no different from any tool or piece of technical equipment, all have performance characteristics that need to be learnt to get the best out of them)

There is an awful lot of BS floating about on the web about this, with (to my mind) overly partisan views expressed Pro and Anti.

At the end of the day - if you don't see it - good for you, if you do, learn to accommodate it in your shooting technique


And - stop moaning and enjoy taking pictures! *yes

Zuiko
30th May 2013, 07:49 PM
It exists (just as Mirror Slap used to occur under some conditions with film 35mm cameras and DSLR's - which is why mirror lock-up was invented) and if you work with particular lenses / bodies at certain shutter speeds it can be encountered

As a retired scientist I was interested enough to do a statistical analysis of over 1000 images and confirmed a slightly skewed peak of blurred images at round /80th - 1/100th with tails at around 1/60th and 1/160th (I can shoot at 1/13th sec and see no blur at all so its a narrow band where the effect may be seen)

BUT

that doesn't make it a "Problem", merely a characteristic of certain combinations of lens / body / operator (people with "Soft" hand-holding technique seem less likely to see it than those who have a firmer, more rigid grip)

Once known about it never arises again as one avoids those regions where it may be seen

(Its no different from any tool or piece of technical equipment, all have performance characteristics that need to be learnt to get the best out of them)

There is an awful lot of BS floating about on the web about this, with (to my mind) overly partisan views expressed Pro and Anti.

At the end of the day - if you don't see it - good for you, if you do, learn to accommodate it in your shooting technique


And - stop moaning and enjoy taking pictures! *yes

Excellent advice, Brian. :)

David M
30th May 2013, 11:17 PM
Sounds like DPR hasn't changed since I stopped visiting about 5 years ago.

Mind you, I can understand the experts complaining, it must be frustrating when a percentage of 10,000 shots of your cat are blurred.

brian1208
31st May 2013, 05:51 AM
Just a thought

"Some People Just Love A Moan! "

could be re-phrased as

Some people just love to moan about other people moaning! :p

My approach has been to let them get on with it and wish them well, for some are at their most happy when they find a reason to complain! *chr

pdk42
17th June 2013, 10:09 PM
Sounds like DPR hasn't changed since I stopped visiting about 5 years ago.

Mind you, I can understand the experts complaining, it must be frustrating when a percentage of 10,000 shots of your cat are blurred.

So true.
:p

Footloose1949
17th June 2013, 10:47 PM
I'll lay odds that this has surfaced via the fanboys of two particular camera manufacturers ... (Ca/Ni) .... Why? because they are continually trying to find faults in other's kit to 'justify' why they don't use anything else!

Imageryone
17th June 2013, 10:53 PM
Same the world over, some people are never satisfied. I have never heard of this, nor want to really, but I would just be interested if the REALLY high end cameras suffer?

ayewing
18th June 2013, 04:16 PM
I seem to remember that "shutter blur" was a hot topic on some of the Pentax forums three years ago following on from worries about "mirror slap". Any rapid mechanical movements whether of shutter or mirror in SLRs can set up vibrations causing impairment of the image. I expect if you looked hard enough it could be found in all brands. Fortunately with mirrorless cameras we do not have to worry about the mirror. Electronic shutters should be free from problems of vibration but have other limitations.

As others have said it is not much of a problem in normal photography and many are unaware that it exists.

OM USer
18th June 2013, 04:38 PM
Give it 10 years and most mainstream cameras will probably have no moving parts. More reliable and cheaper to make. Global shutter is a certainty which will then be followed by some sort of aperture control (LCD blackout mask in the lens?) and possibly a variable density ND filter (great for live view and video). So Auto ISO and auto ND to add to the regular mix of aperture and shutter control.