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View Full Version : OM-D with Panasonic zooms?


Jetset95
22nd November 2012, 09:58 AM
Hi all, just wanted your thoughts as folks with more experience of the OM-D than I, but if you have used it with any of the Panny zooms (in particular the 45-200mm and 100-300mm) could you let me know your thoughts?

I've not had the chance to get out and use it much in the last month, much more getting to know the new body and controls, mainly with the wide Panny primes (14mm and 20mm) and the excellent 12-50mm Oly kit lens.

When I have put the longer zooms on though I just feel like the pictures are a little soft or a little out of focus. Of course it could be me, it could be the fact we've had bugger all light to work with over the last month, it could be any number of things. I'd just like to get some positive confirmation that the OM-D / Panny combo can work and I just need to get out and use it more to find the right shots to make it shine.

I'll try and post some pics to show you what I mean tonight (new to the forum so not sure how to do that yet :eek: )

James

Ian
22nd November 2012, 10:07 AM
The 100-300 is quite close in optical quality to the m.Zuiko 75-300. The 45-200 is a budget lens but not bad for that type of lens. Do you use in-lens Mega OIS or the E-M5's in-body OIS?

The main issue with the 100-300 for E-M5 users is that its iris aperture actuation mechanism is too slow for maximum sequential shooting rate so you are limited to about 6 frames per second instead of 9-10 fps.

Ian

Zuiko
22nd November 2012, 10:13 AM
I use a Panasonic 14-45mm as the standard lens on my E-M5 and cannot fault it.

Jetset95
22nd November 2012, 10:43 AM
The 100-300 is quite close in optical quality to the m.Zuiko 75-300. The 45-200 is a budget lens but not bad for that type of lens. Do you use in-lens Mega OIS or the E-M5's in-body OIS?

The main issue with the 100-300 for E-M5 users is that its iris aperture actuation mechanism is too slow for maximum sequential shooting rate so you are limited to about 6 frames per second instead of 9-10 fps.

Ian
Thanks Ian. Before I got the OM-D I used both on a Panasonic Lumix G3 which gave me results I was very happy with, but most of those were probably shot in the open air with decent light, fast SS, optimal aperture settings and I've not been able to do that since getting the OM-D.

I've been using the OM-D's body stabilisation, could that be the problem (I turned the lens OIS off) - I'll try with the body off and the lens on see if it makes any difference.

I've played around with the 9 fps on the 200mm and maybe that's another reason why I wasn't amazed by the quality, I'll try again (when the rain stops) and just shoot single frames.

Thanks for your quick reply.

James

Jetset95
22nd November 2012, 10:44 AM
I use a Panasonic 14-45mm as the standard lens on my E-M5 and cannot fault it.
Thanks John, good to know I've just got to sort myself out and that there's no reason other my ineptitude.

James

StephenL
22nd November 2012, 10:51 AM
I've got to say that, although I have happily used Panasonic lenses on my E-M5, I find nothing has that certain "sparkle" other than Zuiko glass. Not really down to optical quality, as Panasonic lenses are generally excellent, but "something".

BTW I believe that Olympus' in-body stabilisation is superior to in-lens stabilisation.

Alpha1
22nd November 2012, 10:54 AM
I often use the Pany 100-300 but turn off the lens IS and use the OMD's Ibis stabilisation system.

If I keep both on the images can "look" soft but I think that it is the two image stabilisation systems working against each other resulting in apparent camera movement.

I can see no difference otherwise in image sharpness between using that lens on the OMD or a much more expensive 70-400 lens on an APSc camera. The AF is supposed to be faster than the Oly 75-300.

StephenL
22nd November 2012, 11:02 AM
If I keep both on the images can "look" soft but I think that it is the two image stabilisation systems working against each other resulting in apparent camera movement.



Yes, that's one thing that everyone, even the instruction manuals :eek:, agree on. Only use one form of stabilisation, no matter which. Otherwise, as you rightly say, they "fight" against each other and cause bother! :)

Jetset95
22nd November 2012, 11:07 AM
I've got to say that, although I have happily used Panasonic lenses on my E-M5, I find nothing has that certain "sparkle" other than Zuiko glass. Not really down to optical quality, as Panasonic lenses are generally excellent, but "something".

BTW I believe that Olympus' in-body stabilisation is superior to in-lens stabilisation.
Thanks all - Re: that "something" I know where you're coming from, before I moved from Canon to M4/3 I had an old 50mm prime from my dads system (can't remember what but it worked on the Canon). I was perfectly happy with the pictures but then it got dropped and broke. I didn't have the money to replace it withe something equivalent so bought the cheap Canon "nifty 50" (50mm F/1.8 - all plastic construction). The lens was about the worst quality one I've ever owned, but on the EOS 300D it took some of my favourite pictures of the kids growing up. No rhyme or reason to it, just "something".

Alpha1
22nd November 2012, 04:04 PM
I've got to say that, although I have happily used Panasonic lenses on my E-M5, I find nothing has that certain "sparkle" other than Zuiko glass. Not really down to optical quality, as Panasonic lenses are generally excellent, but "something".

BTW I believe that Olympus' in-body stabilisation is superior to in-lens stabilisation.

I agree with both of these observations.

Similarly many (not all!) of my images taken with Leica glass have a certain "je ne sais quoi" or sparkle that other superb lenses such as Zeiss just do not replicate.

Suffice to say that the only pictures of mine allowed on the walls by 'er indoors, were taken with Leica glass and she doesn't know one camera from another! I hope to change that with some taken with Zuiko glass soon though!

David Morison
22nd November 2012, 04:23 PM
The only Panasonic lens I've used on the E-M5 is the Leica 14-150mm which is my standard go everywhere kit. I personally think it is without equal in it's range and certainly gives me everything I want except it will not AF with the EC14.

The m75-300mm is a little gem but with a max f.no. of 6.7 at 300mm it probably won't perform well with a TC if one was available.

With the 75-300 I use IBIS but with the Leica I tend to use in-lens IS.

David

Bikie John
22nd November 2012, 08:50 PM
I have used the Panny 100-300 on the E-M5 for rugby and cricket in good light and got reasonable results. I don't have any other m43 zooms to compare with, my normal rugby kit is the big43 50-200 on the E-5 (usually with 1.4 times converter) and that is blisteringly sharp. The 100-300 doesn't match it but is still pretty good, good enough that I will probably carry on with it for cricket and happily use ot for rugby when I want to travel light and the weather is kind.

I use the EM-5 in-body IS and switch it off on the lens.

Ciao ... John

Jetset95
22nd November 2012, 10:37 PM
Thanks John, everyone, hopefully the light will brighten up so I can shoot it at F/8 or something half decent at a reasonable shutter speed at the weekend, but it doesn't look like it. Hope noone in the forum is flooded out.

James

Rens
22nd November 2012, 11:10 PM
Hi all, just wanted your thoughts as folks with more experience of the OM-D than I, but if you have used it with any of the Panny zooms (in particular the 45-200mm and 100-300mm) could you let me know your thoughts?

James

I have the Panasonic 45-200. I haven't tried it much, my impression is that it works fine but focuses slower than the 12-50.

Rens

Bikie John
22nd November 2012, 11:21 PM
I posted a thread about using it for the first time at rugby - http://e-group.uk.net/forum/showthread.php?t=22650

I generally shoot wide open or close to it as I like minimum depth of field. One reason for saving the OM-D/Panny zoom for good weather is that unlike the E-5 and lenses, the Panny lens is not weathersealed. Neither is the Oly equivalent. I didn't used to care too much in the days of film and manual focus, but since our modern lenses have electrical innards I really don't think they would appreciate getting wet!

Ciao ... John

drmarkf
28th November 2012, 11:29 PM
Since I got the Panny 12-35 it's rarely left the front of the E-M5 - fast focusing, sharp and low-distortion as long as you use the right post-processing solutions.

I agree the colour balance is very slightly warmer than the Oly house style.