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Zuiko
11th October 2012, 08:44 AM
With the excellent SSWF hopefully dust on the sensor of the E-M5 should not happen very often, but there is always the possibility of a stubbon speck that refuses to shift, making a wet clean necessary.

The question is, can this be done by the photographer or local camera shop, or does the camera have to be serviced by Olympus? There is debate on other forums that only Olympus can do this, as touching the floating sensor could damage the IBIS!

I've looked at the PDF manual (page 102) but it sidesteps the whole issue. If this is true then we should at least be aware to prevent us from accidentally damaging our cameras. And what about the cost, let alone the inconvenience, of sending the camera to Olympus? Some people say Olympus will clean the sensor for free, but one person claims he has been quoted $300! :eek:

Anyone else heard anything?

OlyPaul
11th October 2012, 09:28 AM
I think this was raised a while ago with no forthcoming information John.

But I wish you luck in getting a answer this time.:)

Ian
11th October 2012, 09:59 AM
I will try to get a definitive answer!

Ian

Zuiko
11th October 2012, 12:10 PM
I will try to get a definitive answer!

Ian

Thanks Ian.

Nick Temple-Fry
11th October 2012, 01:11 PM
With the excellent SSWF hopefully dust on the sensor of the E-M5 should not happen very often, but there is always the possibility of a stubbon speck that refuses to shift, making a wet clean necessary.

The question is, can this be done by the photographer or local camera shop, or does the camera have to be serviced by Olympus? There is debate on other forums that only Olympus can do this, as touching the floating sensor could damage the IBIS!

I've looked at the PDF manual (page 102) but it sidesteps the whole issue. If this is true then we should at least be aware to prevent us from accidentally damaging our cameras. And what about the cost, let alone the inconvenience, of sending the camera to Olympus? Some people say Olympus will clean the sensor for free, but one person claims he has been quoted $300! :eek:

Anyone else heard anything?

John

It's obvious that if you get any dust on the sensor, and I of course hope this will not happen, that the camera will be beyond economic repair. If you send it to me I'll happily arrange an environmentally friendly disposal.

Nick

Zuiko
11th October 2012, 01:30 PM
John

It's obvious that if you get any dust on the sensor, and I of course hope this will not happen, that the camera will be beyond economic repair. If you send it to me I'll happily arrange an environmentally friendly disposal.

Nick

That's a very kind offer, Nick, thank you. :D

Wee man
11th October 2012, 03:02 PM
Sorry Nick due to a glitch my earlier post did not show up join the queue to assist in the disposal.

Westy
11th October 2012, 08:56 PM
Shortly after I got my E-M5 I noticed a spot in the corner of my photos. I believed it to be lubricant or dust on the sensor. As I had some wet cleaning wands I decided to clean it myself rather than go through the hassle of sending it back. I had previously cleaned the sensor on my E3 and found it simple enough to do. It took less than a minute of gentle cleaning and was 100% successful. Now I could just have been lucky but no damage was done to the camera.

Ross the fiddler
11th October 2012, 11:28 PM
Shortly after I got my E-M5 I noticed a spot in the corner of my photos. I believed it to be lubricant or dust on the sensor. As I had some wet cleaning wands I decided to clean it myself rather than go through the hassle of sending it back. I had previously cleaned the sensor on my E3 and found it simple enough to do. It took less than a minute of gentle cleaning and was 100% successful. Now I could just have been lucky but no damage was done to the camera.

I would think it to be much easier than the E3 (or any of the DSLR's) with a shorter throat (& no worries about a shutter closing) & I can't see that there could be any problem if done gently.

ayewing
12th October 2012, 01:03 AM
That is quite reassuring. I presume that we do not clean the actual sensor but the glass filter that vibrates and shakes the dust off. I have not needed to clean the sensor on my OM-D so far, but I have undertaken sensor cleaning on my Leica M9 (which has a fixed sensor) and my Pentax K-5 which had sensor shake reduction and automatic sensor cleaning. It should not be any more difficult with the OM-D and the sensor (or its covering glass) is more accessible.

It would be nice to have a few more reports from intrepid sensor cleaners before taking the plunge.

Zuiko
12th October 2012, 01:40 AM
It would be nice to have a few more reports from intrepid sensor cleaners before taking the plunge.

I suppose someone has to take the plunge! :D

Seonnaidh
12th October 2012, 08:45 AM
Having read this thread with a sense of growing alarm I took the opportunity to e-mail Olympus UK and ask for their advice.
I also expressed the sentiment that I will be one very disenchanted bunny if I have bought into a system designed for lens swapping that is non user cleanable. Seems bl**dy stupid to me.

ayewing
12th October 2012, 08:54 AM
I am sure we will all be interested in the reply you receive from Olympus.

Paul19
12th October 2012, 08:57 AM
Over the last 3 years I have had the E-30, E-P2 and now E-5, constantly changed lenses and never any dust! Very different to the Canon 5D I had which seemed to be almost a vacuum cleaner (so I have a large collection of swabs, blowers and chemicals never used since coming to Olympus).
This thread seems almost like a storm in a tea cup.

Zuiko
12th October 2012, 09:11 AM
Over the last 3 years I have had the E-30, E-P1 and now E-5, constantly changed lenses and never any dust! Very different to the Canon 5D I had which seemed to be almost a vacuum cleaner in reverse (so I have a large collection of swabs, blowers and chemicals never used since coming to Olympus).
This thread seems almost like a storm in a tea cup.

There is certainly no need to panic, I've regularly used Olympus DSLRs and lately MFT for 5 years and never once had to clean a sensor. On the other hand there is always a risk of something sticky hitting the sensor (or more accurately the glass filter in front of the sensor) which the SSWF cannot budge. Also, if cleaning can cause damage, this should be clearly pointed out in the manual.

OlyPaul
12th October 2012, 09:11 AM
Over the last 3 years I have had the E-30, E-P1 and now E-5, constantly changed lenses and never any dust! Very different to the Canon 5D I had which seemed to be almost a vacuum cleaner in reverse (so I have a large collection of swabs, blowers and chemicals never used since coming to Olympus).
This thread seems almost like a storm in a tea cup.

Hang onto them you may need them, it took 7 years of use before my E-1 got just a smidgeeon of dust on the sensor.;)

Saying that the MTF has no mirror protecting the sensor when open and it is also nearer the open throat, saying that no dust yet on my E-PL3 which has had heavy use and constant lens changing.:)

Seonnaidh
12th October 2012, 09:17 AM
I too have owned a number of DSLRs and the most resistant to dust on the senors have been Olympus no doubt about it.
However I have experienced some dust on the sensor, usually noticeable at f16 or smaller and they have always been of the sticky variety. Necessitating a 'wet clean' on rare occasions.
Using my camera almost daily I dread having to send it back to Olympus for cleaning and waiting for it to be returned. I guess my only option is to buy another OMD. Perhaps a silver finish one this time.
I'll just go and make my wife a nice cup of tea and ask if I can help with the shopping.

Seonnaidh
12th October 2012, 09:26 AM
Didn't even finish filling the kettle before I heard
"No. You're not having one"

Zuiko
12th October 2012, 10:07 AM
Didn't even finish filling the kettle before I heard
"No. You're not having one"

My wife lets me buy whatever I want, as long as we can still pay the bills and put food on the table. So most of the time it is me telling me I can't do it! :(

Zuiko
12th October 2012, 10:13 AM
I too have owned a number of DSLRs and the most resistant to dust on the senors have been Olympus no doubt about it.
However I have experienced some dust on the sensor, usually noticeable at f16 or smaller and they have always been of the sticky variety. Necessitating a 'wet clean' on rare occasions.
Using my camera almost daily I dread having to send it back to Olympus for cleaning and waiting for it to be returned. I guess my only option is to buy another OMD. Perhaps a silver finish one this time.
I'll just go and make my wife a nice cup of tea and ask if I can help with the shopping.

It is probably best to sit tight until we get clarification from Olympus. At the moment there is loads of conflicting "information" and opinion doing the rounds on the Internet - now there's a surprise! :rolleyes:

Tordan58
12th October 2012, 10:50 AM
When making my mind several years ago, eventually deciding to jump on the DSLR train, one of the reasons for me selecting Olympus was they were the one ones with a proven solution to avoid dust. I have so far owned 3 bodies, changed lenses in many occasions and so far no dust. I guess there is no need for concerns on this subject regarding the E-M5.

Ross the fiddler
12th October 2012, 11:17 AM
Over the last 3 years I have had the E-30, E-P1 and now E-5, constantly changed lenses and never any dust! Very different to the Canon 5D I had which seemed to be almost a vacuum cleaner in reverse (so I have a large collection of swabs, blowers and chemicals never used since coming to Olympus).
This thread seems almost like a storm in a tea cup.

This would also be my feeling too & I believe that should a sticky bit of dust end up on the sensor (somehow) that it would be an even easier process to clean it on this camera (than a DSLR). Even if the official Olympus advice is to send it into service, it may possibly be the same advice from all camera manufacturers anyhow & carefull cleaning with a wet swab as you would on any other camera would probably be fine if done carefully.

Seonnaidh
12th October 2012, 03:57 PM
Certainly a lot to think about.
I've just got in after a fruitless day taking a workshop to find this in my e-mail intray.


Please be advised that technical queries are handled by our Olympus team in Prague.

I have passed your e-mail to them and they will be in touch shortly. Should you wish to make direct contact, their number is 00800 6710 8300 and staff are available Mon – Thu, 9am to 6pm and Fri 9am to 3:30pm CET. Please note that although this is an international freephone number, costs may be incurred if dialling from a mobile phone.

Alternatively, they can be contacted via e-mail at the following address:
di.support@olympus-europa.com

If we can be of any further assistance please contact us on 0800 111 4888 during the hours of 9am – 4pm, Monday to Friday.

Kind regards

Hayley

Customer Support

Olympus

Lets just wait and see.

Zuiko
12th October 2012, 05:37 PM
Certainly a lot to think about.
I've just got in after a fruitless day taking a workshop to find this in my e-mail intray.


Please be advised that technical queries are handled by our Olympus team in Prague.

I have passed your e-mail to them and they will be in touch shortly. Should you wish to make direct contact, their number is 00800 6710 8300 and staff are available Mon Thu, 9am to 6pm and Fri 9am to 3:30pm CET. Please note that although this is an international freephone number, costs may be incurred if dialling from a mobile phone.

Alternatively, they can be contacted via e-mail at the following address:
di.support@olympus-europa.com

If we can be of any further assistance please contact us on 0800 111 4888 during the hours of 9am 4pm, Monday to Friday.

Kind regards

Hayley

Customer Support

Olympus

Lets just wait and see.

So Olympus don't have anyone this side of the old Iron Curtain who can answer whether or not the sensor can be cleaned by the user! :D

JonSchick
12th October 2012, 11:33 PM
Maybe I'm missing something but I don't think the sensor floats when the camera is turned off... In which case it should be no harder to clean than any other system camera. I bet Olympus will recommend the camera is cleaned professionally though - nearly all the manufacturers do!

Zuiko
12th October 2012, 11:56 PM
Maybe I'm missing something but I don't think the sensor floats when the camera is turned off... In which case it should be no harder to clean than any other system camera. I bet Olympus will recommend the camera is cleaned professionally though - nearly all the manufacturers do!

I don't mind the concept of a professional clean if it becomes necessary, I've never needed to have a sensor cleaned and would hesitate to do it myself anyway. But I was thinking more in terms of local camera shop or a drive to a specialist repairer. Sending it to Olympus in Outer Mongolia does seem a bit extreme. If it really does need to be done by Olympus, I'd expect there to be a facility within the UK. There again, maybe it is a rare problem. After all, it hasn't happened to me in five years.

Nick Temple-Fry
13th October 2012, 12:18 AM
Whilst my original offer remains open, and indeed I'll extend it to other e-group members who find their cameras are beyond economic repair due to a dust spot.

I suspect all that has happened is that Olympus has edited out the section that tells you how to ensure the shutter/mirror doesn't fall on you whilst cleaning the 'image transfer device'. After all the E-M5 manual still includes that bit that says you shouldn't use toilet bleach or etching fluid to do the job.

No manufacturer is going to advice ham fisted amateurs (which is after all the target market) to use a scrubbing brush, because of the risk of product claims way into the future.

Actually the whole CSC design makes it really easy just to use a fingernail (or eyebrow tweezers) to scrape the dirt away. At least a DSLR provides some protection fom idiots.

Nick

Ross the fiddler
13th October 2012, 01:23 AM
Maybe I'm missing something but I don't think the sensor floats when the camera is turned off... In which case it should be no harder to clean than any other system camera. I bet Olympus will recommend the camera is cleaned professionally though - nearly all the manufacturers do!

That's exactly my sentiments too. It is true that the sensor does not appear to float when OFF as I have tried to tilt the camera in various directions to detect any movement & there was none.

Ross the fiddler
13th October 2012, 01:27 AM
Whilst my original offer remains open, and indeed I'll extend it to other e-group members who find their cameras are beyond economic repair due to a dust spot.

I suspect all that has happened is that Olympus has edited out the section that tells you how to ensure the shutter/mirror doesn't fall on you whilst cleaning the 'image transfer device'. After all the E-M5 manual still includes that bit that says you shouldn't use toilet bleach or etching fluid to do the job.

No manufacturer is going to advice ham fisted amateurs (which is after all the target market) to use a scrubbing brush, because of the risk of product claims way into the future.

Actually the whole CSC design makes it really easy just to use a fingernail (or eyebrow tweezers) to scrape the dirt away. At least a DSLR provides some protection fom idiots.

Nick

Nicely put! *laugh