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View Full Version : Tip, Changing Focus Area


R MacE
4th December 2007, 03:46 PM
I have my E-3 set to 'Button Timer 8 secs. If I press and release the 'Focus Point' button, scrolling the command dial cycles through the 'Focus Points' within the 'Focus Area' that I'm using. If however I hold the 'Focus Point' button down while scrolling it actually cycles through the 3 'Focus Areas'

I hadn't noticed that before but it's quite handy as I can easily change the 'Area and Point' setting without going to the rear LCD. The changes are visible in the viewfinder (and the rear LCD).

Ian
4th December 2007, 11:09 PM
I have my E-3 set to 'Button Timer 8 secs. If I press and release the 'Focus Point' button, scrolling the command dial cycles through the 'Focus Points' within the 'Focus Area' that I'm using. If however I hold the 'Focus Point' button down while scrolling it actually cycles through the 3 'Focus Areas'

I hadn't noticed that before but it's quite handy as I can easily change the 'Area and Point' setting without going to the rear LCD. The changes are visible in the viewfinder (and the rear LCD).

There seems to be some frustration building up concerning exactly how to use the multiiple AF points for use in continuous tracking of a subject. The manual is a bit vague about this.

How do you get your chosen subject locked onto the AF system? It's not obvious - lots of investigation needed! :)

Ian

R MacE
4th December 2007, 11:58 PM
I've no idea Ian, I normally used the Center Point only when using the E-1. I find that if the subject is close enought it's easier to try to keep them covered by a single point while panning and just fire off short bursts (rather than shooting untill the buffer is full)

I haven't had a chance to try the E-3 in C/AF yet, I'll have to experiment a bit. :)

R MacE
5th December 2007, 12:40 AM
Having had a look at the manual and the camera my take on it is,

'All Area' - Displayed in Viewfinder as ALL -

The camera will use any of the 11 points to obtain 'Focus Lock' if you lose 'Focus Lock' it'll use any of the 11 points to find focus.

'Single Area' - Displayed in the Viewfinder as S-t -

The camera will only use the preset (by the user) single focus point. Once it has a achieved 'Focus Lock' it'll continue to adjust focus to maintain lock. If you lose 'Focus Lock' the camera will attempt to regain focus using only the single pre selected point.

'Single Area Small' - Displayed in the Viewfinder as S-t-S

Same as 'Single Area' butwith increased sensitivity. This has to be selected in the menu from the options Small/Normal

(Spanner 1 > Spanner A - AF/MF > AF Sensitivity > Small)


'Single Area Dynamic' - Displayed in the Viewfinder as S-t-d

The camera uses 4 focus points in a pre-set (by the user) formation. It will attempt to use the preferred single point (again selected by the user) but will also use the surrounding points if it is unable to 'Lock' using the pre selected point. Again if you lose 'Focus Lock' the camera will use any of the 4 points in the pre selected formation.


Like I say, thats how I see it but I'd welcome the opinions of other users. :)

Bo_Nydahl
5th December 2007, 09:38 AM
Muchasos gracias. Very useful.

Mike

Ian
5th December 2007, 10:52 AM
The specific AF issue that needs to be fathomed is where you have a fast moving subject - say when you are panning and the subject is moving around the frame - so you would want to use all 11AF points continuously. The problem is, how do you get the initial lock onto the subject in the first place? The manual simply says the subject will be identifed and the AF system does its best to track it.

Ian

andym
5th December 2007, 11:07 AM
Another thing,has anyone worked out what spiral or loop for the focusing does.Is it just the way you select the priority focus point??

All the best

Andy

R MacE
5th December 2007, 11:25 AM
Hi Andy, that would be my take on it, I have mine set to 'Spiral'

R MacE
5th December 2007, 11:45 AM
The specific AF issue that needs to be fathomed is where you have a fast moving subject - say when you are panning and the subject is moving around the frame - so you would want to use all 11AF points continuously. The problem is, how do you get the initial lock onto the subject in the first place? The manual simply says the subject will be identifed and the AF system does its best to track it.

Ian

I guess if all points are selected the camera will attempt to lock on the closest object. You can test this by pointing the camera at a series of objects sited at different distances, positioning the camera so that a near object is covered by a focus point and a far objest is also covered by a focus point. Manually de-focus and then half press the shutter. I find that the camera will always lock on the object that is closest to the camera even if it needs to use one of the outside points to do so.

I guess what the manual say is correct although it certainly doesn't explain why or how it operates, presumably it switches focus point to the 'Closest' as the object moves around the frame.

Could you give me an example of a situation when a fast moving object would be moving around the frame in a panning situation? I've only been using AF cameras for about 3 years so I still have a tendency to think as if I was using an MF camera where the focus point is always center frame and the subject is also center frame.

emirpprime
5th December 2007, 12:01 PM
I think, but haven't been able to test it yet properly, that the all points AF is mostly for tracking moving targets. It will only really work when using all points on a moving target with C-AF. In that case it will try to track the subject around the frame (and AF points). At other times it seems to lock on the highest contrast object, or something like that anyway. It is more than a little unpredictable.
The other modes seem quite good, allowing standard spot, precise spot, and area focus, which seems to do quite well with moving targets.
It really would be nice to have this clarified so we know when and how best to use it the all points mode, and not just have to grumble!
All the best,
Phil

emirpprime
5th December 2007, 12:06 PM
Yep, it allows the focus point to be set with 1 control wheel as opposed to 2 (when it isn't set in single point mode you use one wheel for horizontal and one for vertical movement, or the 4 way controller). Setting it lets you cycle through them all/a subset (and all points mode).
All the best,
Phil

beardedwombat
5th December 2007, 06:08 PM
It seems to me that when All Points are selected, the camera tries to work out what the subject is and focus on it. It does not focus on the closest object or what is in the centre of the scene necessarily. Seems a bit arbitrary and not a lot of use. Also when All Points is selected and the button pushed in, my camera has the letters HP showing on the top LCD where the frames remaining figure normally is. I can find no reference to this in the manual so have no idea what it means.
Chris

R MacE
5th December 2007, 09:27 PM
Would HP stand for 'Home Position'? See page 55.

beardedwombat
5th December 2007, 10:51 PM
I think you are right. It also shows HP on the monitor as well when All Points is selected. Very strange as I have not registered the Home Position at all.
Thanks
Chris