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View Full Version : Interesting walk with my E-M5


Alpha1
30th August 2012, 07:51 PM
Found this "Chicken of the Woods" lurking in the forest last Sunday. !2-50 lens at 33mm handheld. (see my gallery image...sorry it doesn't seem to want to post here...must be shy!;))

Jim Ford
30th August 2012, 08:37 PM
Here it is!

http://e-group.uk.net/gallery/data/500/8270002_1400x1050_web.jpg (http://e-group.uk.net/gallery/showphoto.php/photo/51349)

Jim

PeterBirder
30th August 2012, 09:13 PM
Smashing shot, thanks for sharing.

ISO 1250. What a great piece of kit the EM-5 is.*yes

Regards.*chr

Graptolite
30th August 2012, 10:14 PM
What a cracking photo. Wonderful colours.
Have you ever eaten it? I've never seen one but often wondered if they're as tasty as the name suggests?

Zuiko
30th August 2012, 10:39 PM
Surely it's too beautiful to eat -this one in particular is a marvellous specimen. *chr

Alpha1
31st August 2012, 07:54 AM
Thanks Jim, I must have misplaced some syntax somewhere!

Chevvyf1
31st August 2012, 08:21 AM
WoW ! That is a crackin shot :) amazing :)

Greytop
31st August 2012, 08:32 AM
Nicely framed with the ivy, lovely colouring, super shot.

ayewing
31st August 2012, 09:04 AM
Splendid colours and nicely composed. Did you need to use any flash?

Wee man
31st August 2012, 10:06 AM
Lovely shot great specimen

Alpha1
31st August 2012, 10:47 AM
Hi Archie, no I didn't use any flash and it was raining, so the light wasn't good. Auto ISO, EVF and Ibis saved the shot in my opinion! The rain and dull light enhanced the colours for me.

Interestingly, I was still evaluating the E-M5 against my Fuji XPro1. Settings were pretty similar but auto ISO on the XP1 gave me a 1/12 sec shutter speed at ISO 400 and with no Ibis, yep it just gave me a soft image!! As it was raining I didn't hang around with the Fuji for another go as neither the camera or the lens is weatherproof!

A big problem with the Fuji XP1 is the inability to set a minimum shutter speed when using auto ISO. The 1/60th sec shutter speed selected by the Oly was perfect with Ibis!

You guessed it, the E-M5 is a definite keeper! :D

dko22
4th September 2012, 10:37 PM
This is Chicken in the Woods taken on the banks of the Isar in Munich seen by many but not picked. The original on this thread doesn't look like CITW unless the E-M5 was doing something very strange to the colours (ie using flash or something but the OP didn't do this) or this is a variant I can't see from the books as it's always shown as bright yellow. As I can't find any close match, I guess it's possible! When young, it is very tasty and actually does taste like a slightly lemony chicken. This was a month ago and just beginning to turn a little bitter but still OK. If it's old and rubbery like the only ones I've so far seen in Scotland, then you can leave it. Perfectly safe to taste a little bit first though to see if worth collecting (it's really unmistakable when you see it!)

David

http://e-group.uk.net/gallery/data/500/7290039.jpg

Alpha1
5th September 2012, 07:49 AM
This is Chicken in the Woods taken on the banks of the Isar in Munich seen by many but not picked. The original on this thread doesn't look like CITW unless the E-M5 was doing something very strange to the colours (ie using flash or something but the OP didn't do this) or this is a variant I can't see from the books as it's always shown as bright yellow. As I can't find any close match, I guess it's possible! When young, it is very tasty and actually does taste like a slightly lemony chicken. This was a month ago and just beginning to turn a little bitter but still OK. If it's old and rubbery like the only ones I've so far seen in Scotland, then you can leave it. Perfectly safe to taste a little bit first though to see if worth collecting (it's really unmistakable when you see it!)

David

David,
I suggest that you look up this particular fungus on the web, http://www.mushroom-appreciation.com/chicken-of-the-woods.html Just did a google search and found several images of this genre of fungus,(Laetiporus sulphureus) some of which looked like your sample and some were more of the colouring of my own image.

I do agree that the dull and relatively wet conditions does tend to enhance colours, which is why I try to take close up's of flowers in dull light!

Chevvyf1
5th September 2012, 07:51 AM
This is interesting as I recall Dave posting an orangey - yellow - cream version a little while ago :)
Nice shot, crisp detail :)

Graptolite
5th September 2012, 10:37 AM
This is Chicken in the Woods taken on the banks of the Isar in Munich seen by many but not picked. The original on this thread doesn't look like CITW unless the E-M5 was doing something very strange to the colours (ie using flash or something but the OP didn't do this) or this is a variant I can't see from the books as it's always shown as bright yellow. As I can't find any close match, I guess it's possible! When young, it is very tasty and actually does taste like a slightly lemony chicken. This was a month ago and just beginning to turn a little bitter but still OK. If it's old and rubbery like the only ones I've so far seen in Scotland, then you can leave it. Perfectly safe to taste a little bit first though to see if worth collecting (it's really unmistakable when you see it!)




I think this illustrates a very good point - that the same species of fungus can appear very different depending on a number of variables - eg. what age the specimen is, whether or not it's dry or damp, damage from slugs/insects animals. Just google for images of CITW to see what I mean! Although it can be notoriously difficult to ID fungii from photos, I'm pretty sure that the OP's identification is correct.

IMHO, by far and away the best book for ID is Roger Phillips 'Mushrooms', unavailable for a number of years, but recently reprinted and available from Amazon. (There is also an excellent Roger Phillips online guide at http://www.rogersmushrooms.com )
But if in doubt, don't eat it. Do what I do instead - give some to the wife to try first! :)

Chevvyf1
5th September 2012, 11:56 AM
David, reminds me of the poor chap at a "Find a new partner" local meeting ... his lady friend asked if he had been married?" he said, "Three times"

She said, " :eek: what happened to them ? "
and he said, " the first two ate poisoned mushrooms ..."

she asked, " and the third ? "

He replied, "head injury, she would not eat the mushrooms :)" ... bom! bom!

Alpha1
5th September 2012, 02:38 PM
I think this illustrates a very good point - that the same species of fungus can appear very different depending on a number of variables - eg. what age the specimen is, whether or not it's dry or damp, damage from slugs/insects animals. Just google for images of CITW to see what I mean! Although it can be notoriously difficult to ID fungii from photos, I'm pretty sure that the OP's identification is correct.

IMHO, by far and away the best book for ID is Roger Phillips 'Mushrooms', unavailable for a number of years, but recently reprinted and available from Amazon. (There is also an excellent Roger Phillips online guide at http://www.rogersmushrooms.com )
But if in doubt, don't eat it. Do what I do instead - give some to the wife to try first! :)
Or do what I do.......... photograph it instead!

dko22
5th September 2012, 06:33 PM
I think this illustrates a very good point - that the same species of fungus can appear very different depending on a number of variables - eg. what age the specimen is, whether or not it's dry or damp, damage from slugs/insects animals. Just google for images of CITW to see what I mean! Although it can be notoriously difficult to ID fungii from photos, I'm pretty sure that the OP's identification is correct.

IMHO, by far and away the best book for ID is Roger Phillips 'Mushrooms', unavailable for a number of years, but recently reprinted and available from Amazon. (There is also an excellent Roger Phillips online guide at http://www.rogersmushrooms.com )
But if in doubt, don't eat it. Do what I do instead - give some to the wife to try first! :)

It was primarily Phillips I was using for identification but quite clearly the US web page referenced above does show the orange variant which was not in the book. To be honest, although my first reaction was sceptical, the more I looked, the more I realised that there was nothing else it could be as there were overall more similarities than differences -- if I hadn't been in a bit of a rush I'd have tried to do more research first. I entirely agree that identifying fungi from books can be a minefield, even if you try several!

I'm afraid that if I'm in doubt, I taste a tiny bit first as no way would my better half be a guinea pig--though not with anything which could possibly be among the handful of really dangerous ones. For instance Russulas are quite unpredictable but you know if they taste of chilli powder then you spit straight out again.

David

Graptolite
6th September 2012, 08:32 AM
In fact, using my wife as a guinea pig wouldn't be all that helpful - for example she can't tolerate wood blewits which make her sick. (She was also sick with shaggy inkcaps but I suspect she had a glass of wine at the same time!) Sadly now she won't eat any fungi except for field mushrooms, chanterelles and ceps.
Looks like it'll have to be the head injury option as suggested by Chevvy.... ;)