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Graham_of_Rainham
2nd July 2008, 01:34 PM
First time using Studio Lighting, so there is a lot to learn and I'd appreciate all and any tips and comments.

http://e-group.uk.net/gallery/data/500/B_W_P6121766_web.jpg (http://e-group.uk.net/gallery/showphoto.php/photo/6517)

Thanks

Graham

Xpres
2nd July 2008, 01:54 PM
Ok then- first impressions are that the image as a whole isn't sharp. The nose is out of focus most obviously. For a frontal shot like this everything needs to be sharp. the crop seems strange, with the extra space on the right especially. Even though the eyes maybe central that space makes it look like they aren't. The lighting seems OK although I'd have filled a little more on the left but you've got what I think you were aiming for.
The expression you've captured is excellent, which is the most important part I reckon.
For a first attempt you've done pretty darn well. :)

B.P.S Studios
2nd July 2008, 02:08 PM
Hi Graham,

Thats a great image and I think Jack as a subject is great. As a first outing with studio lights its a very good job indeed. Just one or two things I would try out though. 1. Try bringing the crop closer to the top of the eyebrow line I think this would bring out the eyes more. 2. I'm not sure about the tint in this case, I think maybe a darker contrast to bring out all those ageing lines around the face and to give the face more texture. It also needs to be sharpened a bit more to give more definition around the LHS at the hair line.

I'd like to know what the camera and light settings were if you didn't mind sharing them. Its a very good shot but could be a great one.

Regards,
Ian

Nick Temple-Fry
2nd July 2008, 02:34 PM
I have sharpened the image and posted as a side by side comparison - (if Graham objects I will of course delete the image)

http://e-group.uk.net/gallery/data/500/facesharp.jpg (http://e-group.uk.net/gallery/showphoto.php/photo/6518)

The thing is I prefer the original presentation - yes the sharpened image brings out far more details and is probably quite helpful with the eyes - but the original image seems more powerful, you get a better sense of the shape.

Do we, sometimes, see or expect a degree of crispness which actually harms an overall image by over-emphasing details compared to the total picture?.

I like the slight of centre presentation, it saves the image from symmetry (which very few faces achieve) and is, I think a good choice.

Nice image - I like it.

Nick

Graham_of_Rainham
2nd July 2008, 04:24 PM
I have sharpened the image and posted as a side by side comparison - (if Graham objects I will of course delete the image)
Nick

Nick,
I would never ever object to someone taking the time and effort to edit any of my images to get across a particular point or demonstrate a technique.

On the contary I am VERY grateful :)

Thank you

Graham

Scapula Memory
2nd July 2008, 06:02 PM
Interesting photo, and the crop although initially strange on the eye appeals the more I look at it. I like what Nick did, brought out some of the cragginess in Jacks face, though Jack might not be as pleased.

Nick Temple-Fry
2nd July 2008, 08:28 PM
I like what Nick did, brought out some of the cragginess in Jacks face, though Jack might not be as pleased.

Strange - because even though I did it I prefer Grahams original. But what struck me in doing it is how much a simple sharpening changed the image, still I suppose it's just the reverse of air brushing and other 'touch up' techniques.

But which one do others like, and why?

Nick

art frames
2nd July 2008, 10:07 PM
Nick

I think the degree of softness in the original is helpful to the image, the degree of informality and grace in the pose is balanced by the tight crop.

It is difficult to go further without knowing the subject and seeing whether this is a good insight to his personality and character.

But I don't think the original has been beaten.

Peter

JohnGG
2nd July 2008, 10:48 PM
I'm pulled both ways. I like the darker tone of the re-done image more than the lighter original. However, I prefer the softness of the original to the sharpened rendition. I'm not sure if I like the crop, though.

I don't think that it matters at all that the DOF is shallow and the nose and ears are out of focus. The most important point of focus in a portrait is the eyes (the nearest eye if shooting obliquely) and you've got them in this shot. A powerful portrait, well realised :)

Cheers,

JohnGG