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View Full Version : alright I may capitulate so a question


Roberta
23rd August 2012, 06:24 AM
If I was looking at buying one, would it be better to get body only and hand pick lenses, or are the kit lenses not to bad. We don't have PEN's so we would have to get some Micro 4/3.
We (Nick and I) saw when someone brought one into the photo club for me to look at.

Roberta

snaarman
23rd August 2012, 07:18 AM
I bought an E-M5 as body only and also a MMF2 adapter.

It works well enough with my "old" 4/3 lenses (9-18, 14-54 mk2 and 40-150). The results are excellent but the autofocus is a tad slow.

It was only when I got the 14-45 and 45 f1.8 m4/3 lenses I realised how fast the AF could be :-)

Pete

StephenL
23rd August 2012, 07:33 AM
The kit 12-50 is not a bad lens. But if I were to buy again I'd go body-only, as I hardly use that kit lens with so many good primes around.

Ulfric M Douglas
23rd August 2012, 08:39 AM
I think it depends on which lenses you already own, and whether you already have something to cover the wide 12mm, or even use that focal length.
Since I already have the Lumix 14-45 and the 4/3rds 14-54 I'd buy body-only (provided the savings were substantially more than the included lens' used price.)
Just do the calculations.

sapper
23rd August 2012, 08:49 AM
I bought it with the 12-50 but have just ordered a 14-140 which I suspect will be my standard lens. I will also probably get the 9-18mm too. That should cover my needs. May sell the 12-50, it is not a bad lens but with the above combination I am not saure I will need it.

tomphotofx
23rd August 2012, 09:06 AM
Hi

Something to consider the EM-5 is Splashproof and Dustproof, the only lens in Micro 4/3 at the moment is the 12-50mm. I have both, I am very pleased with the results, the macro facility works well and if you shoot video the electronic zoom comes into it's own and if bought together you can save 150ish.

I also have the 45mm which is incredibly sharp and have the 75mm on back order as well.

Bottom line depends on your own style of photography as to what lens would suit your purpose.

Hope this helps.

All the best.

Tom

OM USer
23rd August 2012, 10:20 AM
As you don't have PENS, and presumably don't have any Panasonic MFT cameras then you don't have any lenses (I think this is what you are saying). The strength of this is that you are able to choose what lenses you want; the weakness is that you may not know your preferred focal length range. These are my opinions but other people will have different priorities and ideas and you will as well, as indeed you are free to mix lenses from each of these categories.

1) The kit 12-50mm F3.5-6.3 is very cheap as part of the kit (150 on top of the body price). It is however a good lens and shouldn't be misjudged. It has a useful range covering most situations and the 12mm wide end is exceptionally wide for a kit zoom, you are unlikely to need anything wider unless you are seriously into architecture. It is however a bit slow; at 25mm (equivalent to "standard" 50mm) you are approaching F4.7. The lens has a good macro mode. The lens is also physically long.
I coupled this with the Oly 75-300mm F4.8-6.7 as I like shooting wildlife and the longer the better. Handholding at 300mm with the E-M5 IBIS is not a problem. Apart from the small gap at 50-75mm I have covered 12-300mm in just 2 lenses, making for an exceptional small and light kit.
2) For 2 zooms with much more light gathering, the new panasonic 12-35mm F2.8 and 35-100mm F2.8 (the latter not yet in the shops) promise great quality. However you will need deep pockets to afford them. With only 35mm as the max focal length of the smaller lens you will be swapping lenses much more often.
3) For a one zoom kit the try the Oly 14-150mm F4.0-5.6 or the Panasonic 14-140mm F4.5-5.8. Oh, the larger Panasonic lenses come with in-lens image stabilisation so bear this in mind. The 9-18 + 14-140 dual lens kit mentioned above seems a good combination if you prefer wide to long.
4) Some people just go for the primes. 12mm F2.0, 17mm F2.8 pancake, 45mm F1.8, 60mm F2.8 macro (not yet available) and 75mm F1.8. From Panasonic you can get the 14mm F2.5 pancake, 20mm F1.7 pancake, and 25mm F1.4 but there are some reported issues with image quality at high ISO when used on Olympus cameras. With either the Olympus or Panasonic pancake lenses you do have a bright lens and a small package (camera and lens should fit into a large coat pocket).
As I do not have a fast lens I am thinking of the Panasonic 20mm F1.7, wide enough I hope that I will not want anything wider in a fast lens (I do have the 12mm end of my kit zoom). Although the 25mm is faster I am more likely to need something wider. I have no intention of buying both as my budget won't allow and I don't want to end up with a bag full of different lenses and be forever swapping (YMMV as they say). I am however postponing the decision to see what is announced at Photokina in September, hoping Olympus will come up with a fast 20mm or Panasonic may revamp theirs.
5) The Pansonic 14-45mm F3.5-5.6 collapsible power zoom is very small when collapsed. Usefull if you want a small one zoom lens kit. Both Panasonic and Olympus offer other 14-42 zooms (kit lenses with some cameras) of normal dimesnsions.
6) There is a range of ultra wide and fisheye lenses. I don't shoot that wide so will offer no comment.
7) There are some fast manual lenses in native MFT mount. Eg Voigtlander Nokton 25mm F0.95
8) For extremely high quality zooms and primes use the Olympus Four Thirds HG or SHG lenses with the Four Thirds to Micro Four Thirds adapter. Exceptional quality at a reasonable price (for what you get) but they do focus slowly on MFT bodies. My prime objective was fast autofocus otherwise I may have been tempted.

Make sure you read the reviews of any lenses before you buy. Hope this helps.

Ross the fiddler
23rd August 2012, 12:24 PM
I got the 12-50 lens in the (E-M5) kit as it was less than $200, being the only M4/3's lens that I would have (to start with) as it is lovely & fast to focus & quite a versatile lens, plus the MMF-3 adapter was free as a bonus up till the end of June which made the deal even better. I hope to get the M75-300 Olympus or M100-300 Panasonic lens in the future as the 70-300 4/3's lens is slow to focus by comparison.

Bikie John
23rd August 2012, 12:55 PM
I will echo most of the comments above. I bought the kit (body and 12-50) and find it a useful walkabout lens, pretty good quality apart from some colour fringing at the wide end wide open, which is easy to correct in Adobe raw/Lightroom.

Pros for me - weathersealed, which is important in our rainy season (summer) and our cold rainy seasons (spring, autumn and winter). Good value if bought with the body - over here the lens on its own is around GBP300+ (329 today at Wex) while the kit is only GBP150 more than the bare body. Pretty versatile - 12mm is pretty wide, 50mm is nice for portraits, and the builtin macro facility is nice. Plus pretty good optical amd mechanical quality.

Cons - slow max aperture, specially at the long end (f/6.3). Sticks out a long way from the body - the combo is not easily pocketable. No hood or pouch supplied (at least Oly still give us front and rear caps, I wonder how long that will last!).

If you haven't got any micro 4/3 lenses, and Aussie kit pricing is similar to ours, and you want a useful general-purpose lens I would say go for the lens+body combo.

Good luck whatever you choose ... John

StephenL
23rd August 2012, 01:10 PM
One thing worth bearing in mind. A body with the kit lens is probably easier to sell on than body alone. Especially if, as John says, the new price premium is small.

ayewing
23rd August 2012, 04:11 PM
As a recent convert to Olympus and the OM-D I bought it with the kit lens for three reasons.

1. When bought with the camera body it is inexpensive - more costly if bought later.

2. It is weather sealed like the body (actually described as "splash proof). Most if not all other MFT lenses lack weather sealing.

3. It is quite a decent lens and versatile, offering both powered and manual zoom and a surprisingly effective macro setting. It is also quiet and suitable for video if that is a feature that you would use. Useful range of focal length 12-50mm = 24-100mm in 35mm terms.

Its drawbacks are that it is maybe a little bigger than you would expect, the aperture range of f3.5-6.3 means that you need good light to shoot at the long end. There is some distortion but no more than is found in most kit lenses and it can be corrected either in camera (jpg) or in software (raw).

I am quite pleased with it but have already started to add fast primes and a longer zoom. As my collection of lenses grows I may at some point sell it but if I do there will be little financial loss

CJJE
23rd August 2012, 04:55 PM
I bought my E-M5 with the 12-50 lens as in the UK the combo were not that more expensive than the body only option. In practice I find it very useful for holiday snaps - where its slow aperture isn't too much of a drawback, and the zoom range lets you just carry the body with the one lens.

For serious "creative" days, I'd now take my newer Pana 12-35mm f2.8 lens and the Oly 45mm f1.8 prime lens (the 12-35 wasn't out when I bought my E-M5!)

ayewing
23rd August 2012, 08:02 PM
I bought my E-M5 with the 12-50 lens as in the UK the combo were not that more expensive than the body only option. In practice I find it very useful for holiday snaps - where its slow aperture isn't too much of a drawback, and the zoom range lets you just carry the body with the one lens.

For serious "creative" days, I'd now take my newer Pana 12-35mm f2.8 lens and the Oly 45mm f1.8 prime lens (the 12-35 wasn't out when I bought my E-M5!)

Yes that makes sense. I have just ordered a Pana 12-35 f2.8. It should arrive tomorrow. I am sure it will be a big improvement - should be at about 6x the cost!

Ross the fiddler
23rd August 2012, 10:16 PM
If you haven't got any micro 4/3 lenses, and Aussie kit pricing is similar to ours, and you want a useful general-purpose lens I would say go for the lens+body combo.

Good luck whatever you choose ... John

The Aussie kit pricing for the E-M5 & 12-50 lens is at $1499 & so is the twin lens kit of 14-42 + 40-150, however, prices are much better through various outlets (although some are not doing any better than RR) between $1200 to $1400. Some of the reputable online & shopfront stores buy their stock through a discounting wholesaler which purchase directly from Olympus Australia & the retailers can pass on the goods at a very competitive price (with full Oly Australian warranty). That's how I got mine (from a Sydney online & shopfront store). Digital Camera Warehouse (http://www.digitalcamerawarehouse.com.au/category157_1.htm) aren't too bad with their pricing either (they buy direct from Oly Aus.). I hope you end up with something that suits you & are happy with.

Seonnaidh
27th August 2012, 09:14 PM
As usual I'm still faffing about, will I won't I.
When I jump (there I've said it) I will almost certainly go for the Panny 12-35mm, the 45mm f1.8 (is it available in black finish?) but uncertain about a longer lens, maybe the Panny whatever to 300mm.
I'm unsure about the 12-50mm, one of my considerations is it's macro capabilities.
Macro to me is 1:1 .
Decisions decisions. This Damien McGillicuddy guy seems to be very pleased with his.

StephenL
28th August 2012, 08:31 AM
, the 45mm f1.8 (is it available in black finish?) but uncertain about a longer lens, maybe the Panny whatever to 300mm.
I'm unsure about the 12-50mm, one of my considerations is it's macro capabilities.
Macro to me is 1:1 .
Decisions decisions. This Damien McGillicuddy guy seems to be very pleased with his.

At the moment I don't think the 45mm is available in black, though it's been rumoured. But it looks great in silver!

Long lenses at the moment are m4/3's Achilles tendon. There's nothing particularly fast around. Unless you count the Tokina 300mm mirror. The Panny 100-300 is supposed to be pretty good, though.

True macro, again, you're struggling but there you can use legacy glass, as you'd probably want manual focus anyway.

CJJE
28th August 2012, 05:42 PM
I believe the Panasonic 45mm f2.8 macro lens gives 1:1, (and also the forthcoming Olympus 60mm macro lens?). Although we are still waiting to see the image quality delivered by the Olympus 60mm, its longer focal length looks useful even if we will to pay extra for essentials like a lens hood and lens pouch!

Seonnaidh
28th August 2012, 09:28 PM
I often wonder why Oly are so mean about lens hoods.
Ok on their upmarket lenses they include them But don't Panansonic include them with all their lenses?

ayewing
29th August 2012, 12:51 AM
Agree. Other brands e.g. Pentax omit lens hoods on their cheapest DAL versions with plastic mounts but you usually get a lens hood with normal lenses. Olympus seem rather penny pinching when they fail to supply hoods with quite expensive lenses. Hoods bought separately tend to be ridiculously expensive but fortunately the Chinese clones are fairly cheap.

Alpha1
29th August 2012, 07:53 AM
I agree entirely! Fuji sold their lens hood for the X100 separately and that is a dedicated hood and an adaptor is required too. :mad:

However by the time their X Pro 1 was introduced, they learned from the angry customer reaction and all the X1P lenses come complete with hoods *yes, So let's keep up the heat!!

Bikie John
29th August 2012, 08:46 AM
I recently ordered the 75mm f/1.8 and decided that if I ordered the dedicated hood at the same time then the rip-off price wouldn't hurt so much. Lens arrived, hood is "on back-order". So I cancelled the hood order and got a generic screw-in for a tenner instead which appears to do a perfectly reasonable job.

Ciao ... John

StephenL
29th August 2012, 08:51 AM
And are you finding the lens as good as you expected?

Ross the fiddler
29th August 2012, 10:32 AM
I recently ordered the 75mm f/1.8 and decided that if I ordered the dedicated hood at the same time then the rip-off price wouldn't hurt so much. Lens arrived, hood is "on back-order". So I cancelled the hood order and got a generic screw-in for a tenner instead which appears to do a perfectly reasonable job.

Ciao ... John

Not much different to the E-M5 & it's battery. :rolleyes:

Bikie John
29th August 2012, 11:02 AM
And are you finding the lens as good as you expected?

On the assumption that this is to me re the 75mm - I've only had a couple of chances to try it out in battlefield conditions and the light was very poor for the first and uninspiring for the second. Focal length and aperture is a good combo for what I wanted it for - musicians in smallish venues - and it handled nicely. Quality looks excellent at a first glance. I'll get some samples up as soon as I have time to think about them.

Ciao ... John

Roberta
29th August 2012, 11:14 AM
As I started this foray....................WE, note I am giving Nick some input, have been lens crunching......its either go where Ross went, twin kit costs not much more than the single lens kits or go body and a 14-150mm. I have what you all call a dreaded "Canon" which is good for what I bought it for, so part of our (my) plan is to accomodate, the carry around lens, on Nick's E620 and my E600 a 18-180mm..............my E620 has a 70-300, the canon 100-400mm (L), so the 14-150 gets us in the zone .............I will get to hoods later. So feel free to tell me the error of my ways.............................
Roberta