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View Full Version : A3 print size?


timmypreston
15th July 2012, 08:57 PM
I have sold a picture in a 10x8 and now the person wants it in A3 also. I have never done a print this big. What should I resize the image to for the best results?

Currently cropped in 10 x 8?

Zuiko
15th July 2012, 10:05 PM
The first thing to check is does you customer want to keep the 10 x 8 proportions - if they do then the nearest to A3 would be 15 x 12 inches. The nearest commercial print size to this is 16 x 12 so you'd have to ask the lab to print the full image, leaving a white margin on the long side (or you can change the canvas size of your picture before sending to the lab). This won't matter because the margin will, of course, be covered by the mount when it is framed.

If the customer does actually want the picture printed A3 it will invove quite a significant crop to the existing image area.

How many ppi is the 10 x 8 sized at? Assuming it is 300 ppi, then the image size is 3000 x 2400 pixels. For a 15 x 12 I would resize to 3750 x 3000 at 250 ppi, which should be fine for a print this large. Don't forget to re-sharpen if necessary.

tomphotofx
15th July 2012, 10:08 PM
Hi

You are going to have problems as 8 x 10 and A3 have different aspect ratios so to get to A3 on the long side will mean you will lose some of your image on the short sides. Now if you have Photoshop CS5 or 6 you can get over that by using the Content Aware Scale command in the edit menu which will allow you to resize the aspect ratio without distortions.

Now how to resize from 8 x 10 to A3 without losing image quality you could increase the 8 x 10 in 10% increments (ie image size 110%) four to five times which will retain image quality.

Another method is to create a blank document 420mm x 297mm @300dpi resolution in Photoshop then copy and paste your 8 x 10 as a new layer and the convert it to a Smart Object which is in the layers menu, convert to smart object this will then protect your image from loss of quality as you resize to fill the A3 doc.

Hope that doesn't sound too complicated, have a look on Youtube re Content aware scale, and Smart Objects to get a better idea how this works.

All the best.

Tom

Zuiko
15th July 2012, 10:08 PM
P.S. Congratulations on the sales! :)

OlyPaul
16th July 2012, 06:41 AM
One would hope you have the original image before you cropped it to 10x8, never crop the original and save it but save it has a copy.

If you have the original then there is little cropping to do, A3 is 16.5 x 11.7 inches and the 4/3 ratio fits a 16x12 print.

If you are talking about interpolating the image (adding pixels) then there really is no need for a print this size from a 4/3 image.

Ulfric M Douglas
16th July 2012, 07:42 AM
Has anyone done an A3 print from a 10 or 12mpx 4/3rds photograph using both methods : straight file to printer and upsizing for print?
Same image.

Which was best, or were they visually identical?

OlyPaul
16th July 2012, 08:44 AM
I have four 20x16inch prints which is larger than A3 hanging on the wall from the E-30 and they did not need up sizing to keep the detail.

RogerMac
16th July 2012, 09:10 AM
Has anyone done an A3 print from a 10 or 12mpx 4/3rds photograph using both methods : straight file to printer and upsizing for print?
Same image.

Which was best, or were they visually identical?

Try adjusting to the pixels per inch to the appropriate size for A3 and then do a small crop from an area with plenty of detail. Print the result on 6 by 4 inch paper. Then up res the result to (say 300ppi), repeat the 6 x 4 print, and compare the results. I would expect the results to be identical but you will know for certain

Roger

Bikie John
16th July 2012, 09:45 AM
Has anyone done an A3 print from a 10 or 12mpx 4/3rds photograph using both methods : straight file to printer and upsizing for print?
Same image.

Which was best, or were they visually identical?

I haven't done a direct comparison but I generally resize in Photoshop first - make it the target size at 240ppi. Then I can check it at 100% on screen for loss of detail and have a guess at how much sharpening it might need before sending to the printer.

Some while ago the folk wisdom was that PS did the interpolation better than printer drivers did. I've no idea whether this is still the case, but having settled on a workflow I've stuck with it.

Ciao ... John

meach
16th July 2012, 11:44 AM
Has anyone done an A3 print from a 10 or 12mpx 4/3rds photograph using both methods : straight file to printer and upsizing for print?
Same image.

Which was best, or were they visually identical?

Not exactly but I've printed out an A4 section from two versions of the same 16 Mp shot from my G3 resized to 24" by 18" - one simply resized and the other resampled (and therefore much bigger in terms of Mbytes). I can't see any difference between the two prints.

Robusto
16th July 2012, 12:02 PM
Has anyone done an A3 print from a 10 or 12mpx 4/3rds photograph using both methods : straight file to printer and upsizing for print?
Same image.

Which was best, or were they visually identical?


I have done a few A3 prints and never had a problem as my printer prints A3 and scales the photo to fit when i use Paint Shop Pro

Ulfric M Douglas
16th July 2012, 01:46 PM
Well, that answers my question fellas, thanks again : those who didn't resize/resample had good results letting the printer do that part of the job.
Nuff said.
(I think I abused the Thanks button a bit there...)

Gwyver
16th July 2012, 01:55 PM
I have sold a picture in a 10x8 and now the person wants it in A3 also. I have never done a print this big. What should I resize the image to for the best results?

Currently cropped in 10 x 8?

Tim,
You haven't mentioned what image processing or printing software you have available for use. If you have Lightroom, Qimage, or similar, printing the picture at the changed (A3) size will be very straightforward and any pixel interpolation and output sharpening changes will be handled automatically.

timmypreston
16th July 2012, 07:35 PM
A massive thanks for all of this info!

I have a copy of the original so that is not an issue.

The person buying the picture has asked for a poster size for his business reception wall so 16x12 would be ideal.

Using the original taken on an E400 what is the biggest you could go to before things get distorted? 20x16 sounds tempting to ask him about.

Bikie John
16th July 2012, 07:52 PM
As always Tim, the answer is "it all depends" - which doesn't help you much!

If it's going to be hanging in your client's reception, people will probably not be looking at it very close-up so you can get away with a drop-off in quality. Just look at a photo on a billboard close-up to see how bad it can be! Can you do your own printing? You could resize the file to 20 by 16, then crop a chunk at 10 by 8 or A4 out without resizing or resampling and print that. You might find that it's fine even close-up. But if it looks a bit rough at close quarters, blu-tak to a wall and look at it from further away and you will probably find it is fine.

Good luck ... John

timmypreston
16th July 2012, 08:14 PM
Thanks John, I don't do my own printing. I usually use snapfish.

David M
17th July 2012, 12:02 AM
I don't consider 12x16 poster sized but you should be able to go bigger than that with an E-400 file. I licensed an E-410 shot to a tourism organisation who used it as a double page magazine ad and considered it for billboard at the time.