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View Full Version : Photographers sells DSLR system for the E-M5


Ian
27th June 2012, 10:16 AM
Nice story:

http://www.thephoblographer.com/2012/06/21/op-ed-why-i-sold-everything-for-the-olympus-om-d-e-m5/

Ian

StephenL
27th June 2012, 10:30 AM
That should ruffle a few feathers in the Big Boy's camp!

Bill Gordon
27th June 2012, 11:11 AM
I have read a number of articles much the same. Yes, the DSLR is not on its' way out yet....it is a pro system and has its' following but their is no question in my mind that the OM D5 is the way of the future. By the way Ian we had a bit of an exchange over the name and that is the name that seems to pop up at the top of the list over here. Now over there....I think that Oly has a bigger following particularly with this new addition. If I end up owning one it will be a long way down the line because I have a lot of work to do refurbishing my body since my health problems that screwed up my holiday this year. Big hospital bills with no out of country insurance. My problem so I am not complaining but I have a long way before I recover from this.

Cheers and keep on shooting and giving us this great site!!

Ian
27th June 2012, 11:20 AM
Actually, there is no law dictating what you call a camera :D But the correct name for the E-M5 is the "OM-D E-M5" - but I know lots of people say OMD, or OM5 :D

The thing is that eventually there will be an additional OM-D model so calling it an OM-D will start to be confusing! OM-D is the sub-family of Olympus Micro Four Thirds cameras just like 'Pen' but with an integrated viewfinder.

You just rest and get better, Bill!

Ian

Olybirder
27th June 2012, 12:31 PM
Actually, there is no law dictating what you call a camera :D But the correct name for the E-M5 is the "OM-D E-M5" - but I know lots of people say OMD, or OM5 :D
I assumed that OM-D refers to the range of cameras (OM Digital) and that this is the E-M5 model. I guess we can call it whatever we want though. :)

Ron

Greytop
27th June 2012, 01:12 PM
I must admit the interesting highlighted article (thanks Ian) is no longer a huge surprise given...
a) how well the E-M5 has been received.
b) having had mine for a while, it ranks as my favourite camera (so far) by some distance.

Oh and yes I can mine an E-M5 :D

Wally
27th June 2012, 01:39 PM
I was lucky enough to have a quick look at one [thanks to John /jdal] on Sunday's outing at Seaham. My biggest surprise was weight relative to size... a very solid piece of kit. Like the article above says, it has to be right for you and your way of togging. For me, it would require an EVF like the VF-2 [foldable] as I can't really use the LCD screen without have to fumble around for a second pair of specs. If I had another nit to pick it would be that the 'extra' grip, [not the battery part] should be part of the original camera design as without it it just doesn't feel right. All things being equal, it is an otherwise excellent piece of kit. However, given my sitrep problems... Sorry Oly, the e-m5 has been put on the back burner for now.

brian1208
27th June 2012, 02:59 PM
I traded my canon 60D + a couple of less used lenses to fund my EM5 kit. I added to that the Kipon EOS to m4/3rds adapter so I can use my sigma 400 f5.6 and 100 f2.8 LIS and am very pleased so far
BUT
I've kept my 5Dmk2 + a few of my favourite L lenses as I'm not brave enough to make the full jump just yet (can't get the birds in flight shots I want with the EM5 for example)

Cathrine Stephansen
3rd July 2012, 02:13 PM
I traded my canon 60D + a couple of less used lenses to fund my EM5 kit. I added to that the Kipon EOS to m4/3rds adapter so I can use my sigma 400 f5.6 and 100 f2.8 LIS and am very pleased so far
BUT
I've kept my 5Dmk2 + a few of my favourite L lenses as I'm not brave enough to make the full jump just yet (can't get the birds in flight shots I want with the EM5 for example)

This is what I worry about, too. I find myself more and more interested in bird photography, and OM-D EM-5 just doesn't seem to be the camera of choice in that field, from what I've read. The E-5 is OK, and since I have the 300 mm 2.8 (regular 4/3), I am using that body for birds, although the continuous autofocus is useless and multiple focus points are unreliable. But I would like the extra resolution in MPs that come with the new sensors and I need to know there will be bodies for all my 4/3 lenses in the future too, without focusing issues with my old lenses! Of course, the future could be to keep the Oly lenses that are suitable for landscapes and still macros, and to buy a Nikon, Canon or Pentax with a new big telelens for birding and fast-focus insect macros. It'd be an expensive solution though, but I might be surer of getting an acceptable body for the lenses in the future, as Canonikon probably won't abandon their customers as Oly have with 4/3. Sure, they promise there will be bodies for the 4/3 lenses in the future, but apparently we won't get full use of the lenses as focusing is slowed down unless they put some effort into that. Slow autofocus is useless for bird photography.

By not being able to give any reliable information about the plans for the 4/3 system, they are killing a perfectly good DSLR system which has its users. Some of us don't need or want scene-modes or iAuto, but need a pro-level camera and prefer to do the thinking ourselves. Olympus Norway told me quite clearly that there will not be another 4/3 body after the E5. So what do I do when the body is worn out? There seems to be focusing issues with the adapter from 4/3 lenses to the m4/3 bodies from what I read, so I'm not investing in a OM-D model until they have that sorted. Oly's focus seems to be on the consumer market and street photograhy. Not wildlife or landscapes which are my interest.

Don't get me wrong, I really like the lenses I have now, and really like the nice big E5, but some day it'll wear out, and I'd like a replacement for the E3 with its 10 MPs for a trip to Greenland in September and Antarctica in February. It's not my current cameras, but the future ones that are a worry for us who have gone the 4/3 road :mad: I've been a faithful Olympus user since 1980, but I wonder what the status for my 4/3 lenses will be when my E3 and E5 are worn out. If I'd only waited half a year buying my E3 and lenses in 2008, I would have had Pentax today, a system with a future.

So no further investments in Olympus for me until I see fast focusing happening with the m4/3 bodies on the SWD 4/3 lenses and the 300mm 2.8. Sorry for the bad mood, but with around 19000 pounds invested in 4/3 equipment, I think I have the right to expect that those fantastic lenses have a future. *yes

Wally
3rd July 2012, 03:27 PM
Sorry for the bad mood, but with around 19000 pounds invested in 4/3 equipment, I think I have the right to expect that those fantastic lenses have a future. *yes

I have to agree with much of what you said... 19000 very good reason to be miffed big time and the right to be asking questions that need to be asked.

This should lead to an interesting dialogue as I'm sure many others are in the same boat... paddling furiously against the current [trend].

StephenL
3rd July 2012, 03:52 PM
Much as I love my E-M5, because it is admirably suited for both my physical needs and my particular photgraphic interests, I have to admit that any type of contrast-detect autofocus system currently produced is not best suited for rapid-moving wildlife photography. Of course, in the olden days we had to focus lenses manually ;)

Cathrine Stephansen
3rd July 2012, 04:32 PM
Much as I love my E-M5, because it is admirably suited for both my physical needs and my particular photgraphic interests, I have to admit that any type of contrast-detect autofocus system currently produced is not best suited for rapid-moving wildlife photography. Of course, in the olden days we had to focus lenses manually ;)

We did! And I get quite a few hits with single AF :eek: on birds today with the E5 and 50-200 SWD and the 300mm 2.8! It's about practice.

This was shot with the 50-200 @ 1/2000 sec ISO 500:
http://csspikkerud.zenfolio.com/img/s1/v49/p166694341-5.jpg

and this with the same, also at 1/2000 sec, ISO 640
http://csspikkerud.zenfolio.com/img/s11/v35/p585730380-5.jpg

I just want there to be a future for the 4/3 camera system, and I want to continue getting images like this with more pixels and better ISO capabilities.

I hear plenty of people saying that the m4/3s are too small. I like the E-PL3... WHEN it has its underwater housing on! :D On land, it's too small and fiddly to use fast. The XZ-1 is much faster to use, but none of them come even close to proper cameras with buttons. Some things just don't need changing. Our hands haven't become that much smaller than they were in the 70's...

Actually, the E5 and the 300 mm 2.8 weigh only 4.3 kg put together. I may have the body of a small and feeble woman (who said that before me :D?), but I have no trouble holding that baby on fieldwork for several hours at sea.
OK, since my separation I am probably getting stronger from buying sofas at IKEA on my own :D, but the point is that some of us like the big cameras, and think the PENS are for smaller girls. :D:D:D:D Just keep improving the E series for grown-ups with better resolution and better high ISO capabilities for ordinary UK/Norwegian lighting conditions meaning ISO 1000-1200 weather(face it - we won't be getting any sun this summer either...:mad:), but we probably don't need the night vision of ISO gazillion-something.

This is hand held, proving the light-weight functionality of the E5/300mm 2.8:

(1/1000 sec f/8 , ISO 500 (300 mm 2.8)

http://csspikkerud.zenfolio.com/img/s2/v51/p1035632795-6.jpg

Wreckdiver
3rd July 2012, 05:11 PM
I too have the same concerns as Cathrine and have a considerable amount of money tied up in FT lenses, bodies and accessories. I like the big heavy Four Thirds pro bodies and would like to think that Olympus would continue to support the Four Thirds system. I have E-1, E-30, E-3(2) and E-5 bodies but would love to see an E-5 successor with the OM-D E-M5 chip fitted. I am not looking for anything revolutionary just an evolutionary progression of the E-5 benefitting from the OM-D developments would be fine for me. I am concerned that I will end up with a lot of expensive glass and no body to use it all with. I have no interest in switching to the micro FT system, I would go for a Canikon if I do switch.

Selling all my kit and going for a full frame Canikon could be an option but it's a drastic one and I am not in a financial postion to make the jump right now. The Nikon D800 looks extremely tempting but the cost of this and equivalent lenses to my Zuiko collection would be totally out of the question right now. If I wait to see what Olympus will do what will the value of my current lenses be in the future?

So, I am not in a postion to jump ship right now and I don't really want to but not knowing what the future will be is frustrating.

Steve

SteelD
3rd July 2012, 07:28 PM
Maybe I'll sell my 5D and L lenses at some stage. My passion is travel and street photography. I hauled the 5D kit around India and Cuba and even stuffed it into the saddlebags of a Harley-Davidson when travelling Route 66 but a forthcoming trip to Vietnam means that I have to travel light and so the OM-D seems to fit the bill. I've commited to an OM-D kit with the 12-50mm and supplemented it with 12mm, 20mm and 45mm primes so I hope it justifies my investment.

Wreckdiver
3rd July 2012, 07:50 PM
Coming back on track from my slight departure from the subject in my post above.

I was recently diving in Gozo and whilst I was there Dr. Alex Mustard (renowned marine biologist and underwater photographer) arrived at the same appartments to do a review on the OM-D E-M5 and the Olympus UW housing. His report is here on Wetpixel (http://wetpixel.com/i.php/full/alex-mustard-reviews-olympus-om-d-e-m5/) and I must admit that this camera does seem to be getting some very good write-ups and reviews.

Steve