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View Full Version : A few questions on the OM-D, please


Loup Garou
30th May 2012, 08:42 AM
I have joined the current flood of people interested in buying the Olympus OM-D E-M5 camera. Although I used SLRs widely during the film era, since the digital revolution I have bought just compacts. Therefore, the OM-D will be my first digital SLR (micro 4/3 to be precise). Before buying it I want to ask a few questions please

Is the camera's metering TTL? If so, can I use a polarising filter?
If I mount the little kit flash unit on the hot-shoe and fix the FL600R on a bracket next to the camera, willthe wireless technology within the bigger flash pick-up the camera settings? Or will it behave like a slave flash?
In addition to the kit lens, will I get full functionality with the Olympus Zuiko 17mm f/2.8 pancake and Olympus Zuiko ED 40-150 f/3.5-5.6 R lenses?
Thanks in anticipation

PeteBoo
30th May 2012, 08:49 AM
Hi,
I can only answer your first question.
The Olympus OM-D E-M5 utilizes through-the-lens image sensor metering with a maximum of 324 zones.
A full review of the camera here.

http://www.dpreview.com/reviews/olympusem5/

DekHog
30th May 2012, 09:04 AM
1. TTL - yes

2. The camera/hotshoe flash will totally control the off-camera flash. All camera settings are communicated to the off-camera flash, so it's far from a dumb slave that requires setting manually.

3. Yes, with the appropriate adapter, you can use your Zuiko lenses on the OM-D, although the focus speed to be somewhat slower than M.Zuiko lenses

StephenL
30th May 2012, 09:37 AM
I think the lenses you are quoting are m4/3 versions. If so they have full functionality. I have the m4/3 40-150 R lens (the R just means it's "restyled", ie, freshly painted!) and it's a beautiful little performer. I did have the 17mm and it too is quite a good lens.

Zuiko
30th May 2012, 10:34 AM
As others have said, you cna use a polarising filter with the TTL metering, you will have full off camera flash control and the lenses you mention are fully compatible.

The 17mm f2.8 is not a bad performer, but neither is it the best lens Olympus has ever produced. Alternatives you could consider are Panasonic 20mm f1.7 and Sigma 19mm f2.8.

Ian
30th May 2012, 10:37 AM
I got here too late! I hope this demonstrates how useful the site can be :)

Ian

Kiwi Paul
30th May 2012, 11:18 AM
Stephen you had the 14-150 too I think, how does the 40-150 compare to it w.r.t IQ?

Paul

Loup Garou
30th May 2012, 12:33 PM
Thanks people. Olympus say that those other lenses I mentioned are also micro 4/3 but not designed specifically for the OM-D (presumably for the PEN series). I was hoping that I could use them without adapters and retain full functionality.

peak4
30th May 2012, 12:47 PM
Anything micro 4/3s from Panasonic, Olympus, Sigma etc. will work seamlessly on the OM-D without an adaptor.
Full size 4/3s will also work with a suitable adaptor if required, though focussing speed may be compromised.

You can also use a whole range of legacy film lenses with suitable adaptors, obviously in Manual Focus and Stop Down modes only, but Aperture priority will work fine, as will image stabilisation. For the latter, you just need to tell the camera the focal length of the lens.

Your comment about Olympus saying that other lenses are not designed specifically for OM-D probably refers to the waterproofing of the 12-50mm kit lens supplied with the body. I wonder what other "Designed for OM-D" lenses are in the offing?

Loup Garou
30th May 2012, 12:58 PM
I wonder what other "Designed for OM-D" lenses are in the offing?

No idea, but I expect some will be out soon. Right now I am slightly annoyed with Olympus' decision to sell only the black 12-50 lens with the kit irrespective of the body colour. There is a very nice looking dual tone 'silver' 12-50 lens available and IMO it matches the silver OM-D body very well. But for reasons best known to themselves, Olympus decided not to include the silver lens choice as part of the kit.

I checked with over a dozen UK retailers as well as in Germany but as things stand, the kit lens is always black. They are unable to swap even if they have the silver lens in stock. :mad:

Ian
30th May 2012, 01:04 PM
I would even be so bold as to say that whoever told you that the lenses you mentioned not being designed for OM-D is actually mistaken. The EM-5 is designed for Micro For Thirds, so Micro Four Thirds lenses are designed for the E-M5.

Ian

Loup Garou
30th May 2012, 01:16 PM
I would even be so bold as to say that whoever told you that the lenses you mentioned not being designed for OM-D is actually mistaken. The EM-5 is designed for Micro For Thirds, so Micro Four Thirds lenses are designed for the E-M5.

Ian

Sorry, I should have explained...I thought I did. The person merely said that those other lenses were not specifically designed for the OM-D. As the other poster said, perhaps they meant weather sealing?

Ian
30th May 2012, 01:27 PM
It's a nonsensical statement. Both those lenses are ideal for use on any Micro Four Thirds camera, including the E-M5. If it did make sense we wouldn't be debating it here :)

Ian

Loup Garou
30th May 2012, 01:31 PM
OK, thanks. That is helpful because I was going to add those two lenses to the kit next month (after the paycheck :))

StephenL
30th May 2012, 01:45 PM
Stephen you had the 14-150 too I think, how does the 40-150 compare to it w.r.t IQ?

Paul

I did, and used it with the GH2. I sold it because it was not stabilised and I wasn't aware of the OM-D coming out. If I had been, I would have kept it as it was a really good lens. As far as I can recall, there was little or no difference in IQ in the areas where focal length were the same. For a lens with such a wide range it was/is remarkable.

SteelD
11th June 2012, 10:24 PM
Is the camera's metering TTL?
Hi Loup

I see that this has already been answered but note that this is your first digital. Like lots of advances, when something becomes commonplace, nobody promotes it as a reason to buy their brand any more. TTL was something new when many cameras had a selenium or cadmium sulphide light metering cell on the body of their camera so, as it was a more accurate form of metering, TTL was something to shout about. Earlier cameras had no metering at all and you had to use a separate meter or guess the exposure using something like the sunny 16 rule.

Nowadays, I don't think that there are any non-TTL cameras made. TTL metering also went from an average reading across the viewfinder scene through to centre-weighted and then onto matrix metering where clever software algorithms in the camera attempt to guess what type of scene you are attempting to photograph and give you an optimum exposure. Matrix metering might be mentioned in the specs these days but manufacturers now try to outdo each other with the number of segments or zones in the matrix. These days, accurate exposure measurement is taken for granted and nobody shouts about TTL because everybody has TTL metering. (It reminds me of some cars that had a 5sp badge on the back because they had 5-speed gearboxes - we don't see that any more as I'm not sure if any new car has less than 5 speeds (gears) in their gearboxes.)

Polarising filters may sometimes affect the metering and may also affect the autofocus if the wrong type of polariser is selected. Polarisers used to be of a type called linear but most autofocus systems require the circular type of polariser. Hope that gives you a little more background.

Loup Garou
12th June 2012, 05:35 AM
Hi Loup

I see that this has already been answered but note that this is your first digital.

No, the OM-D is my first digital 'SLR' - or more correctly my first digital camera with an interchangeable lens system. After selling my old Canon EOS10 in 2003, I bought the Minolta Dimage A1 just as it came onto the market. A few years later I swapped it for a Canon G9 which I still have.