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Zuiko
20th August 2011, 04:29 PM
Had a pitch at my 4th craft fair recently (6th August), so Iím starting to get a feel for how itís going. The first one seems a long time ago now. Looking back through my accounts I see I took £38.20 that day, out of which I had to pay a pitch fee of £10.00. Not really enough to make it a viable business but at least it was a profit and it seemed encouraging as it was my first attempt.

The 2nd fair gave me takings of £23.20, which was a bit disappointing, but at least I covered the pitch fee if not the petrol. At the 3rd event takings shrunk to £10.85 so I was hoping that the latest event would reverse the trend.

So how did I do? Well, I certainly reversed one trend. On the previous three occasions I did at least take some money. This time I took nothing! I didnít sell even one small card!

What went wrong? I can come up with all sorts of excuses, the main one being that the event was poorly attended; at the end the organizers thanked all the stall holders over the PA system for supporting the event and persevering through the day despite the disappointing numbers coming through the gate. I wonder if there are just too many rival events happening on the same day at this time of year. Or are people staying at home, or at least avoiding anywhere that they are likely to spend money? After all, these are difficult times.

I had just 18 people visit my stall. Nearly all were really complimentary about my photography, but I wonder if that roughly translates to a young lady telling a young man he is ďreally sweet;Ē in other words ďI donít want to hurt your feelings but youíve got no chance!Ē I remember those days well!

For one of the long hours I kept a record of potential customers passing my stall. By ďpotential customerĒ I mean someone who might reasonably be expected to have enough interest to come for a look so I didnít count children and counted couples (husband and wife etc) as one, on the basis that they tend to visit stalls together at this type of event and any purchase they might make would be between them rather than separately. Between 12.30 and 1.30 sixty-six potential customers went by, with seven of them actually stopping. It turned out to be the busiest hour of the day. These figures include a group of 9 singers who were performing at the event, 4 of whom came to look at my stall. One of them apologized that they were only having a look around the show and didnít intend to buy anything.

Iím starting to accept that, for whatever reason, my products are not attractive enough, interesting enough or good enough. I donít think they are too expensive, I cannot go much cheaper! Itís true that I havenít yet had a banner made but Iím seriously wondering if itís worth sinking anymore money into this venture. Iíve got another five fairs booked, but wonít book anymore unless things dramatically improve. Four of them are indoors in the lead up to Christmas, so hopefully the clientele will be more focused on shopping rather than just having a good day out with their families. We shall see.

Zuiko
20th August 2011, 07:13 PM
John, it will have nothing to do with the quality of your work or the finished products you are offering. Sadly the British Public seem to no longer appreciate the value and quality of hand made original items, preferring the mass produced cheap varieties every time.

I do wood turning as a hobby and have tried to sell hand turned bowls made from beautiful expensive hardwood timber without sucess. I then decided to try my hand at selling hand turned Light and Blind Pulls made from cheap timber at £1.50 each on Ebay and sold a couple of hundred. These sold not because they were hand made and original but simply they were cheaper than the mass produced ones on offer. Unfortunately the change in Postal Charges and Packet Sizes put an end to this venture.

I notice on your web site that you sell prints but didnt see any cards on offer. Have you considered selling greetings cards in small variety packs from your site ? I only ask this because I knew a local artist who had the same disappointing results as you have experienced selling prints at Craft Fairs but seemed to have much better results selling greetings cards made from prints of her artwork over the internet. It seems a search for "greeting cards" used to highlight her site and hence her modest success with these.

Hopefully as you say, things will improve later in the year and I wish you the very best in your ventures.

John

Thanks John, it's a good point about my website, which badly needs updating, it's certainly worth a try offering cards on there. :)

Daveart
20th August 2011, 07:17 PM
Hi I know how you feel, I did a fete a couple of weeks ago, didn't sell anything, just really good comments, one was interested but said he couldn't make his mind up out of three, but never came back, there was another guy selling photo prints he didn't sell any either, I think that its the sign of the times. Lidles don't help either selling canvas prints for £10.00 20x16 at that.

But good luck with your next one, I'll keep fingers crossed for you.

Dave

PeterBirder
20th August 2011, 08:23 PM
John, I believe the problem is simply the current economic climate and people are just not spending money unless they absolutely have to.
We had a terribly disappointing day at Abberton today, I think we had fewer visitors all day than were present when you dropped in during the week! It was one of my "optics days" and we had the benefit of an excellent unsolicited write up for the event in the national Birdwatching Magazine. What did I sell? one secondhand bench clamp for a tripod centre column for £12! I think we had three people who even looked at our display of binoculars and telescopes. Our total sales for the centre for birdfood/books/ optics/tea and coffee/ice creams/sweets and toys etc.etc. was around £80 against our weekend day target of £500. I have to say that a colleague who ran a Sunday optics day at the beginning of the month sold £800 worth of binoculars but days like today are becoming more frequent.

I think John (heatingman) has a good point about using your website. I believe that it's important to get the right "keywords" on your homepage so that search engines like Google generate hits from the people you want to target.

Above all, don't believe that your experience so far is anything to do with the quality of your work, it isn't!

Regards*chr

Zuiko
20th August 2011, 09:00 PM
Hi I know how you feel, I did a fete a couple of weeks ago, didn't sell anything, just really good comments, one was interested but said he couldn't make his mind up out of three, but never came back, there was another guy selling photo prints he didn't sell any either, I think that its the sign of the times. Lidles don't help either selling canvas prints for £10.00 20x16 at that.

But good luck with your next one, I'll keep fingers crossed for you.

Dave

Dave, sorry to hear that you are in the same boat! I hope things improve next time for you, too. :)

Zuiko
20th August 2011, 09:11 PM
John, I believe the problem is simply the current economic climate and people are just not spending money unless they absolutely have to.
We had a terribly disappointing day at Abberton today, I think we had fewer visitors all day than were present when you dropped in during the week! It was one of my "optics days" and we had the benefit of an excellent unsolicited write up for the event in the national Birdwatching Magazine. What did I sell? one secondhand bench clamp for a tripod centre column for £12! I think we had three people who even looked at our display of binoculars and telescopes. Our total sales for the centre for birdfood/books/ optics/tea and coffee/ice creams/sweets and toys etc.etc. was around £80 against our weekend day target of £500. I have to say that a colleague who ran a Sunday optics day at the beginning of the month sold £800 worth of binoculars but days like today are becoming more frequent.

I think John (heatingman) has a good point about using your website. I believe that it's important to get the right "keywords" on your homepage so that search engines like Google generate hits from the people you want to target.

Above all, don't believe that your experience so far is anything to do with the quality of your work, it isn't!

Regards*chr

Peter, sorry to hear you had such a disappointing day at the centre, that really does surprise me. If that happens too often it will be a big blow for the Trust. Do you think some people are put off by the work that is going on at the reservoir? I hope not, the story about that is facinating and very interesting in it's own right.

We'll be coming again soon, but haven't worked out exactly when, to collect the giant snail that Freya has reserved. She bought a tank for it yesterday and is very excited about getting "Speedy!" When we come we plan to spend a whole day, rather than just a flying visit.

That's a good point about getting the right information on my website homepage and keywording. Ive keyworded individual pictures, but nothing about selling! I really must give it some attention. :o

PeterBirder
20th August 2011, 09:42 PM
Peter, sorry to hear you had such a disappointing day at the centre, that really does surprise me. If that happens too often it will be a big blow for the Trust. Do you think some people are put off by the work that is going on at the reservoir? I hope not, the story about that is facinating and very interesting in it's own right.

We'll be coming again soon, but haven't worked out exactly when, to collect the giant snail that Freya has reserved. She bought a tank for it yesterday and is very excited about getting "Speedy!" When we come we plan to spend a whole day, rather than just a flying visit.

That's a good point about getting the right information on my website homepage and keywording. Ive keyworded individual pictures, but nothing about selling! I really must give it some attention. :o

Thanks John.
We certainly get a lot of people turning up who say " Oh we thought you'd be closed" that's why we put up the big banners at the entrance sayig WE ARE OPEN.:D
"Speedy" I like that.*yes
Let me know when you are coming and I can try and be there to show you round if you like. We're usually around on Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Saturdays.

Regards

Zuiko
20th August 2011, 09:57 PM
Thanks John.
We certainly get a lot of people turning up who say " Oh we thought you'd be closed" that's why we put up the big banners at the entrance sayig WE ARE OPEN.:D
"Speedy" I like that.*yes
Let me know when you are coming and I can try and be there to show you round if you like. We're usually around on Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Saturdays.

Regards

That would be great, Peter. I'll try to influence the family for one of those days. :)

snaarman
20th August 2011, 10:06 PM
This all reminds me of sitting at craft fairs many years ago in a previous life. Poor turnouts, depressingly low sales, lots of driving :-) You're not alone.

I used to say the collective noun for punters at a craft fair is "Tight Bunch"

There's no fix for a poor turn out, but you might attract punter's interest by doing some macro photography live on the stand (and it would help to pass the time). Set up lights, a subject, a tripod. You know.. "Hello, what's this guy up to..."

Pete

Nick Temple-Fry
20th August 2011, 10:15 PM
Always had some difficulty with the village fete/fair as a selling point for goods, the footfall is low and the percentage of that small number who want a postcard/print has got to be small.

Quite frankly the GBP is conditioned to buy cheap and tacky (£1 shop/car boot) in the hope that something might be a bargain, or expensive and validated by the retailer (gallery/well known name shops/web).

I kept my views out of the original debate in the genuine hope you would prove me wrong.

Nick

Zuiko
20th August 2011, 10:24 PM
This all reminds me of sitting at craft fairs many years ago in a previous life. Poor turnouts, depressingly low sales, lots of driving :-) You're not alone.

I used to say the collective noun for punters at a craft fair is "Tight Bunch"

There's no fix for a poor turn out, but you might attract punter's interest by doing some macro photography live on the stand (and it would help to pass the time). Set up lights, a subject, a tripod. You know.. "Hello, what's this guy up to..."

Pete

Now that's quite an innovative idea, Pete, I'll give that some serious thought! :)

Zuiko
20th August 2011, 10:34 PM
Always had some difficulty with the village fete/fair as a selling point for goods, the footfall is low and the percentage of that small number who want a postcard/print has got to be small.

Quite frankly the GBP is conditioned to buy cheap and tacky (£1 shop/car boot) in the hope that something might be a bargain, or expensive and validated by the retailer (gallery/well known name shops/web).

I kept my views out of the original debate in the genuine hope you would prove me wrong.

Nick

Hehe, I think I'm doing rather well at proving you right at the moment, Nick. Still, you don't know until you try and if something doesn't work you try something else. I've noticed that the tombolas always seem to do quite well, although goodness knows why, so with all the equipment for a stall I could diversify! :D

Hopefully recording my experiences, good or bad (OK, mainly bad at the moment), may be useful to anyone else thinking of trying the same sort of thing.

Maybe I should invent a reputation for myself and offer my work through up-market galleries for a four figure sum. You never know, the Emperor's Clothes syndrome might just work! :D

sapper
21st August 2011, 09:06 AM
John.
I have had similar experience to you. The first fete was a local school fete where a couple of camera club members and myself booked a table. I did very well, around £100, one other did quite well and the other sold one card.
I continued to do the same fete by myself and over a couple of years the takings was around £100 but gradually tailed off to around £30. I haven't done that one for 2 years now. I think the same folk were seeing the same pics and so I need to supply different pics or wait till we get different parents thru the school.

I used to support my local hospice and we both did very well, hospice and me. Over a three year period I would take £100 or so, but gradually takings went down. Other stallholders reported the same. This year the hospice did not hold a summer fair, I suspect because folk were not spending.
My prices were cheap, £9.99 for a half size A3 plus mounted print, slightly bigger than A4 and the cards go for £1.99 each or 6 for a tenner.

I did pick up a wedding from one of them I did though, that was a bonus.
I like Pete's idea, you often used to see artists working during slack periods. A camera linked to a laptop to show the item being shot.

Having said all that, I did a talk at a local church group last year, just holding prints and talking about how I got the pic, nothing technical, and I sold 2 prints for £20 each the first time. Next time I took some cards as well and sold quite a few, not sure how many.

Ulfric M Douglas
21st August 2011, 10:15 AM
Made you a graph ;

http://img543.imageshack.us/img543/2007/zuikograph.jpg

( From http://nces.ed.gov/nceskids/createagraph/default.aspx )

Zuiko
21st August 2011, 10:55 AM
John.
I have had similar experience to you. The first fete was a local school fete where a couple of camera club members and myself booked a table. I did very well, around £100, one other did quite well and the other sold one card.
I continued to do the same fete by myself and over a couple of years the takings was around £100 but gradually tailed off to around £30. I haven't done that one for 2 years now. I think the same folk were seeing the same pics and so I need to supply different pics or wait till we get different parents thru the school.

I used to support my local hospice and we both did very well, hospice and me. Over a three year period I would take £100 or so, but gradually takings went down. Other stallholders reported the same. This year the hospice did not hold a summer fair, I suspect because folk were not spending.
My prices were cheap, £9.99 for a half size A3 plus mounted print, slightly bigger than A4 and the cards go for £1.99 each or 6 for a tenner.

I did pick up a wedding from one of them I did though, that was a bonus.
I like Pete's idea, you often used to see artists working during slack periods. A camera linked to a laptop to show the item being shot.

Having said all that, I did a talk at a local church group last year, just holding prints and talking about how I got the pic, nothing technical, and I sold 2 prints for £20 each the first time. Next time I took some cards as well and sold quite a few, not sure how many.

Dave, thanks for sharing your experiences. In some ways it's comforting to know it's not just me, but otherwise depressing to learn that it seems to be a general trend. I can always try to change my products/improve the quality/adjust the prices but it's much harder to change a trend! However, your experience with the church group shows that trying something different can pay off, so there is hope! :)

Zuiko
21st August 2011, 10:58 AM
Made you a graph ;

http://img543.imageshack.us/img543/2007/zuikograph.jpg

( From http://nces.ed.gov/nceskids/createagraph/default.aspx )

Haha! That's great! Really made my day - thanks Ulfric. *laugh

Bikie John
21st August 2011, 11:33 AM
I've got to be honest here - I would be delighted to come across Zuiko or any other photogs at a craft fair. I would enjoy looking at the photos, and talking photography given half a chance. But I almost certainly wouldn't buy a photo print. If Snaarman was doing some live macro stuff I would be very interested, and would certainly waste his time talking about it, but with a view to "hmm, must try that at home" rather than "must buy one of the prints". I don't have many of my own photos on the walls, and the only other photog to feature is Denis Thorpe with his classic B&W of Hebden Bridge.

I would be much more tempted by a set of cards if I REALLY liked the photos. I would also be a sucker for a well-produced photo book, and willing to pay a reasonable price as long as I could take it away on the spot.

Good luck ... John

Zuiko
21st August 2011, 11:49 AM
I've got to be honest here - I would be delighted to come across Zuiko or any other photogs at a craft fair. I would enjoy looking at the photos, and talking photography given half a chance. But I almost certainly wouldn't buy a photo print. If Snaarman was doing some live macro stuff I would be very interested, and would certainly waste his time talking about it, but with a view to "hmm, must try that at home" rather than "must buy one of the prints". I don't have many of my own photos on the walls, and the only other photog to feature is Denis Thorpe with his classic B&W of Hebden Bridge.

I would be much more tempted by a set of cards if I REALLY liked the photos. I would also be a sucker for a well-produced photo book, and willing to pay a reasonable price as long as I could take it away on the spot.

Good luck ... John

Thanks John. Paradoxically I think (or at least thought!) that the potential market would most likely be non-photographers, people who may appreciate nice pictures but not take any themselves. Photographer's tend to hang their own pictures on their walls, or one of the classic, iconic photographs - a status mine have yet to reach! :o

As for the photobook, no problem producing one these days, the problem is the cost! You've got to really want a book to shell out £30 for it, especially when you can get Joe Cornish or David Noton for half that on Amazon. :eek:

BobS
21st August 2011, 12:03 PM
John, have you considered selling at an art shop on a commission basis or do they want too much?

sapper
21st August 2011, 12:14 PM
I've got to be honest here - I would be delighted to come across Zuiko or any other photogs at a craft fair. I would enjoy looking at the photos, and talking photography given half a chance. But I almost certainly wouldn't buy a photo print. If Snaarman was doing some live macro stuff I would be very interested, and would certainly waste his time talking about it, but with a view to "hmm, must try that at home" rather than "must buy one of the prints". I don't have many of my own photos on the walls, and the only other photog to feature is Denis Thorpe with his classic B&W of Hebden Bridge.

I would be much more tempted by a set of cards if I REALLY liked the photos. I would also be a sucker for a well-produced photo book, and willing to pay a reasonable price as long as I could take it away on the spot.

Good luck ... John

I wouldn't expect photographers to buy my prints or cards. It is mainly women that buy my stuff.
But, many times a photographer will eye my stuff up, mentaly comparing his/her efforts with mine it seems. Sometimes they comment, sometimes just drift away.

Homer Simpson
21st August 2011, 01:47 PM
Is it simply that people don't put photos on their wall at home anymore?

I have decent shots that have personal significance that I'd like on the wall but "the boss" would certainly veto it.

Ulfric - you are a cruel man:D:D

'heatingman - another woodturner here!
People comment on how good the stuff I make is, but no one would be even willing to pay the cost of the wood.

The only chance for this stuff (woodturning, photos, whatever) is to sell them in a "I saw you coming " shop ( Copyright Harry Enfield).

Zuiko
21st August 2011, 02:19 PM
John, have you considered selling at an art shop on a commission basis or do they want too much?

I have just recently sold one through a local gallery, a 16x12 mounted and framed to 20x16, for £45. The gallery take 30% (£13.50) which leaves me about £17 profit after taking into account the cost of printing and framing. Hoping to get the cheque tomorrow.

It's not a fortune but if I could play the numbers game it would add up. I had two pictures in this open exhibition, the only photographs amongst approximately 80 pieces of art, and I was the only one to make a sale so it seems that all artists are struggling at the moment. Mine were also the cheapest, an original artwork obviously takes more time and should command a higher price than a photograph which can be printed time and time again. This is the same gallery where I'm due to have my own exclusive exhibition for three weeks next February.

I am planning to get more prints mounted, so I can hopefully distribute them around local galleries and gift shops, but the under-cover market in Chelmsford has been closed for 6 weeks for structural repairs so I can't use my cheap but excellent mounter/framer at the moment.

LMGruchy
21st August 2011, 10:34 PM
Oh crumbs, our club had an exhibition a couple of months back and all I sold were a couple of cards. I'd never done anything like it before, was a complete novice. I looked on it as market research and the research said that it's not a good market. Mind you, that might have been due to the low numbers through the door.

Also might have been my lack of skill/low artistic merit/too expensive/too amateur etc etc.

One problem I suspect is that everyone can take a reasonable photo and turn it into cards nowadays, often with significance to their nearest and dearest, so anything sold at £1.50 has to be more visually attractive than the six pack for a quid at the supermarket.

Depressing, huh?

Is it just Essex?

Zuiko
21st August 2011, 10:42 PM
Oh crumbs, our club had an exhibition a couple of months back and all I sold were a couple of cards. I'd never done anything like it before, was a complete novice. I looked on it as market research and the research said that it's not a good market. Mind you, that might have been due to the low numbers through the door.

Also might have been my lack of skill/low artistic merit/too expensive/too amateur etc etc.

One problem I suspect is that everyone can take a reasonable photo and turn it into cards nowadays, often with significance to their nearest and dearest, so anything sold at £1.50 has to be more visually attractive than the six pack for a quid at the supermarket.

Depressing, huh?

Is it just Essex?

Not sure if it's just Essex, but it's certainly depressing!

BobS
22nd August 2011, 07:34 AM
Judging by the local markets stalls and fairs etc., every Tom, Dick and Betty is making cards these days. Is this due to the telly shopping programmes?

Zuiko
22nd August 2011, 09:14 AM
Judging by the local markets stalls and fairs etc., every Tom, Dick and Betty is making cards these days. Is this due to the telly shopping programmes?

Perhaps that is why nobody buys them, everyone now makes their own! :D

sapper
22nd August 2011, 01:06 PM
O

Is it just Essex?

No, it's the same in Kent.

CallaWolf
26th August 2011, 12:41 PM
Have read every word of this thread - and I'm now utterly depressed

Zuiko
26th August 2011, 01:44 PM
Have read every word of this thread - and I'm now utterly depressed

Sorry Ceri, I didn't mean to depress you, depression is meant to be my speciality. Anyway, if you want to sell some pictures you might do better than me - could hardly do worse! :)

sapper
26th August 2011, 01:56 PM
Have read every word of this thread - and I'm now utterly depressed

Thing to do is your market research. Ask the right questions, sus out the markets.
I used to try and sell pics that I liked, thats OK but other folk liked other stuff.
I found women liked flowers. Poppies always sell. I sold local views rather than views of the Lake district, local churches did Ok. Animals varied.
Having said that, I was often surprised by what some folk did buy. Stuff I have had for a while, dog eared and someone would love it, I was just glad to get rid of it.

One thing I have done is photograph local school productions.
Take pics at dress rehearsal, pose pics of the main characters, pose pics of support kids, choir, dancers ETC.
Nip down to the local photo shop and get 6 x 4's run off. Turn up on evening when parents are present, sell pics cheap and unmounted. No fuss but because pics are cheap, parents buy.
I have done this a few times and although I wouldn't earn a living, it does bring in the pennies.
Plus, you could get some portrait/wedding bookings too.

Seonnaidh
27th August 2011, 03:15 PM
Peter,
Don't lose heart we are all in the same boat and it is my considered opinion that the economic climate has the biggest effect on sales.

Up until this year we used to do very well at craft fairs. We did even better at high end 'Art Fairs'. This year? Might as well have stayed at home for some of them. The observations my wife and I have made goes something like this.
At most of the village/small craft fairs there are often at least five other 'photographers' trying to sell their wares.
However at the high end of the market there seems to be an almost reverse trend. Less footfall certainly but sales seem quite buoyant.
At a recent 'invite only' art fair run by a large Scottish insurance company we sold eight 20 x 16 ins prints in one hour and forty minutes.

Then last week end we went to a small (read miniscule) local village gala and
sold nearly all the stock. The reason A coach load of 52 American tourists came by called in and stripped the place.

Keep at it. The good times will come. There is nothing wrong with your work from what I can see. Thesehard times will kill off the bottom feeders and thise with resove and determination will survive and go on to do well.

Trust me I'm a photographer!

Chevvyf1
29th August 2011, 10:10 AM
John I am sorry to hear of your project and wish you more sales - I would not bother with more - do check out your local Council and Business Development plans - Many store have "Christmas NOW in August" to be first in; Many stores are absolutely DREADING this Christmas ... from the Internet and the Economic decline "Order on line and collect in store" means Peeps like House of Fraser are getting the Punters in and they spend a little bit more ... but thats hard graft for a pittance ... more and more stores are going Internet and not high street - and shows are losing Exhibitors ! Check the Exhibitors lists before you book and monthly thereafter ... many are cancelling :( - too many Peeps are not going out to where "they may spend money" .

Nick and I take Cash NO CARDS and often dont bother spending the cash - as we can do without/dont really need it ! (Except my Wolf Outdoor coat; and two furry fleeces I fell in love with ...but they will last for years keeping me warm & dry!)

Worse are e-cards ! and "de-cluttering" and "minimalist living styles" :)

Peeps are interested in themselves and their children/pets/possessions (motorbikes :) ) ... so portraits at shows are a good source of funds :)

... the cards go for £1.99 each or 6 for a tenner.

I did pick up a wedding from one of them I did though, that was a bonus.
I like Pete's idea, you often used to see artists working during slack periods. A camera linked to a laptop to show the item being shot.

Having said all that, I did a talk at a local church group last year, just holding prints and talking about how I got the pic, nothing technical, and I sold 2 prints for £20 each the first time. Next time I took some cards as well and sold quite a few, not sure how many.

I have similar experiences and prices - rather sell 6 for £10 and buyers want a free one/bargain and it eliminates the "I am not sure which 3 to have" !

With Churches I see it as "Relationship Marketing" I specifically take nice shots of our churches and around the villages to sell as Christmas Cards - giving the Church itself 100 free (each has my name/contact details sticker on the back) so its Marketing for more sales, this year and next year. I even have Peeps asking me for some more of last of two years ago - now thats publishing profits (do it once & sell many times, each time profit is greater) !

I even let the Parish website use some photos on their websites :) with credit/contact details.

By my front door I have a large "garden seat cushions box" with boxes of cards for those dropping by when we are out to select their purchase and a trusty box for the money! - if we are home (and we work from home/retired) we often welcome and sit in the garden chatting with some of the "buyers" furthering the relationship and marketing !

No Pitch costs; No fuel costs; No Saturday or Sunday stuck at a show with little potential in sales *yes

Yes it can be a bind "Peeps knocking at your door" begging to buy :eek: BUT Hey best that than ...

Chevvyf1
29th August 2011, 10:21 AM
Peter,
Don't lose heart we are all in the same boat and it is my considered opinion that the economic climate has the biggest effect on sales.

Up until this year we used to do very well at craft fairs. We did even better at high end 'Art Fairs'. This year? Might as well have stayed at home for some of them. The observations my wife and I have made goes something like this.
At most of the village/small craft fairs there are often at least five other 'photographers' trying to sell their wares.
However at the high end of the market there seems to be an almost reverse trend. Less footfall certainly but sales seem quite buoyant.
At a recent 'invite only' art fair run by a large Scottish insurance company we sold eight 20 x 16 ins prints in one hour and forty minutes.

Then last week end we went to a small (read miniscule) local village gala and
sold nearly all the stock. The reason A coach load of 52 American tourists came by called in and stripped the place.

Keep at it. The good times will come. There is nothing wrong with your work from what I can see. Thesehard times will kill off the bottom feeders and thise with resove and determination will survive and go on to do well.

Trust me I'm a photographer!


I could not agree with you MORE !*yes *chr We were invited to an Art Ex and one of the Artists sold a picture for £29,000 and another for £14,000 - but the lower price items which usually sell in "shed loads" did not :(

Peeps are still buying £750 1m x 1m shots of them or their family from Venture Portraits !

Phill D
29th August 2011, 06:34 PM
Chevvy what/who are Peeps?

Chevvyf1
29th August 2011, 06:39 PM
Peeps is short for People ! aka the public/punters ! *chr

Phill D
29th August 2011, 07:06 PM
Ah should have guessed - must go and get more coffee, or maybe time for something stronger ;) after all it's a bank holiday *chr

davidsa
29th August 2011, 08:34 PM
Peeps is short for People ! aka the public/punters ! *chr

Chevvy:

Saves just one letter!

sponner
4th September 2011, 01:16 PM
Thanks for the insight into your craft fair/fete experience.

I'm still working out which way to go once I have the necessary skill to produce the images that I think are good enough.

It seems to me that the trick is to get your work seen by someone who is likely to part with a significant amount of cash for it, I'm not sure local fairs etc are the best plce for that given teh time and expense involved.

The other downside is the cost of production, stock = money spent with no gaurantee of a return.

Here's an idea I'm thinking of and welcome any thoughts (I haven't got past the idea stage yet).

Get an enahced CRB check (such as thoise required for scout leaders etc. about £70)
Approach local junior football/cricket/hockey club
Offer to attend several games in the capacity of official photographer
Take lots of images aiming for at least one good action shot of every member of the squad
Attend clubs annual awards night with laptop and maybe 3-4 excellent prints as samples
Take orders from the proud parents who view the images fo their kids on laptop
Not sure of pricing yet, somewhere around £15 for an unframed 8x6 with £5 commission to club funds for every order.
Larger prints, canvas etc at higher prices.

A friend of mine who's kids are sporty reckons thare was a guy who attended his lad's club occassionally and probably took 20-30 orders each time.

A variation would be to attend a tournament where there may be 10-20 local teams present on the day, displaying the images on a web page accessed by a password given to the club secrataries and taking orders via paypal, atgain with a commission to the club.

There are always child protection issues but with the relevant checks in place and commssion for the clubs who are always short of cash this seems like a good potential earner.

sapper
4th September 2011, 01:46 PM
Not sure an individual can get a CRB check done, I think they can be done from Scotland but not England. You need a body, Scouts, Church or School for EG to do it on your behalf.

sponner
4th September 2011, 01:49 PM
ah first fly in the ointment then, The FA, local cricket bodies must ahve processes in place to cvover this though I'm guessing

Chevvyf1
4th September 2011, 04:53 PM
Not sure an individual can get a CRB check done, I think they can be done from Scotland but not England. You need a body, Scouts, Church or School for EG to do it on your behalf.

Or assist a Childminder; live in a Childminder's house who HAS to get OFSTED to do a CRB check (for FREE) on everyone living or often in the house !
(you could volunteer to work in a Day Nursery and get a free CRB check; or drive a tax as these also have CRB's but I think you have to pay £65 or so ?)

Zuiko
4th September 2011, 04:54 PM
Might pay to canvass a few local clubs in the first instance, to see if there is a demand and, if there is, hopefully persuade one of them to apply for a CRB check at your expense. Would there also be a demand for photographing more senior teams where CRB is not an issue? Players might like pictures of themselves in action, particularly if it is scoring a goal or hitting a six!

Chevvyf1
4th September 2011, 05:07 PM
Thanks for the insight into your craft fair/fete experience.

I'm still working out which way to go once I have the necessary skill to produce the images that I think are good enough.

It seems to me that the trick is to get your work seen by someone who is likely to part with a significant amount of cash for it, I'm not sure local fairs etc are the best plce for that given teh time and expense involved.

The other downside is the cost of production, stock = money spent with no gaurantee of a return.

Here's an idea I'm thinking of and welcome any thoughts (I haven't got past the idea stage yet).

Get an enahced CRB check (such as thoise required for scout leaders etc. about £70)
Approach local junior football/cricket/hockey club
Offer to attend several games in the capacity of official photographer
Take lots of images aiming for at least one good action shot of every member of the squad
Attend clubs annual awards night with laptop and maybe 3-4 excellent prints as samples
Take orders from the proud parents who view the images fo their kids on laptop
Not sure of pricing yet, somewhere around £15 for an unframed 8x6 with £5 commission to club funds for every order.
Larger prints, canvas etc at higher prices.

A friend of mine who's kids are sporty reckons thare was a guy who attended his lad's club occassionally and probably took 20-30 orders each time.

A variation would be to attend a tournament where there may be 10-20 local teams present on the day, displaying the images on a web page accessed by a password given to the club secrataries and taking orders via paypal, atgain with a commission to the club.

There are always child protection issues but with the relevant checks in place and commssion for the clubs who are always short of cash this seems like a good potential earner.

Sorry I meant to say "these are great ideas!" with little up front costs apart from time :D I wish you the best of success with this !