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Jim Ford
17th April 2008, 06:54 PM
Andym in this posting:

http://e-group.uk.net/forum/showthread.php?t=1569

stated the difficulty of getting rid of telephone wires.

Bruce Fraser in his 'Real World Adobe Photoshop CS2' (page 709), gives a useful technique for removing lines and scratches, under the subject 'Stroking Paths'.

"1) Draw the path using the Pen tool, keeping as close to the centre scratch (or powerline, or whatever) as possible.

2) Select the Clone Stamp tool, and click the Aligned button in the Options bar. To remove a light coloured scratch, set the mode to Darken; to remove a dark powerline, set the mode to Lighten.

3) Choose a soft brush a little wider than the widest point of the scratch.

4) Alt-click beside the start of the path to set the source point for the cloning operation, just as you would if you were going to clone-stamp the scratch by hand.

5) Shift-click on the Paths palette to hide it, then drag the path over the Stoke button at the bottom of the palette."

He then goes on to say that:

"The keys to making this technique work are careful selection of the brush size and point source."

I've tried this technique myself and it works a treat!

Jim

andym
17th April 2008, 06:56 PM
Andym in this posting:

http://e-group.uk.net/forum/showthread.php?t=1569

stated the difficulty of getting rid of telephone wires.

Bruce Fraser in his 'Real World Adobe Photoshop CS2' (page 709), gives a useful technique for removing lines and scratches, under the subject 'Stroking Paths'.

"1) Draw the path using the Pen tool, keeping as close to the centre scratch (or powerline, or whatever) as possible.

2) Select the Clone Stamp tool, and click the Aligned button in the Options bar. To remove a light coloured scratch, set the mode to Darken; to remove a dark powerline, set the mode to Lighten.

3) Choose a soft brush a little wider than the widest point of the scratch.

4) Alt-click beside the start of the path to set the source point for the cloning operation, just as you would if you were going to clone-stamp the scratch by hand.

5) Shift-click on the Paths palette to hide it, then drag the path over the Stoke button at the bottom of the palette."

He then goes on to say that:

"The keys to making this technique work are careful selection of the brush size and point source."

I've tried this technique myself and it works a treat!

Jim

Thanks

I'll give it a go at the weekend.

andym
17th April 2008, 06:58 PM
Just thought I only have PS 7 or Elements6.I'll have a look though.

shenstone
17th April 2008, 09:02 PM
Andym in this posting:

http://e-group.uk.net/forum/showthread.php?t=1569

stated the difficulty of getting rid of telephone wires.

Bruce Fraser in his 'Real World Adobe Photoshop CS2' (page 709), gives a useful technique for removing lines and scratches, under the subject 'Stroking Paths'.

"1) Draw the path using the Pen tool, keeping as close to the centre scratch (or powerline, or whatever) as possible.

2) Select the Clone Stamp tool, and click the Aligned button in the Options bar. To remove a light coloured scratch, set the mode to Darken; to remove a dark powerline, set the mode to Lighten.

3) Choose a soft brush a little wider than the widest point of the scratch.

4) Alt-click beside the start of the path to set the source point for the cloning operation, just as you would if you were going to clone-stamp the scratch by hand.

5) Shift-click on the Paths palette to hide it, then drag the path over the Stoke button at the bottom of the palette."

He then goes on to say that:

"The keys to making this technique work are careful selection of the brush size and point source."

I've tried this technique myself and it works a treat!

Jim


Wow ... They make it hard don't they...

Painsthop Pro process is as follows

1. select scratch removal tool
2. draw stright line
3. admire result...

See Adobe ain't perfect !!!

Regards
Andy

Jim Ford
18th April 2008, 08:08 AM
Ah but 'canned' procedures don't always have the flexibility sometimes needed!
;^)

Jim

Ellie
18th April 2008, 01:58 PM
Crikey, that looks like hard work. :eek:

With Photofiltre I just select the clone tool, check it for size, control/click on the area I want to copy and draw over the blemish.

OlyPaul
18th April 2008, 02:47 PM
For cloning straight lines like this you can do it just as easily in elements or PS by setting the clone point and clicking once on the begining of the line then hold the alt key down and click on the end of the line and it will do it automaticly between the two points without having to manualy draw the line or bothering with a path. ;)

shenstone
18th April 2008, 04:41 PM
Ah but 'canned' procedures don't always have the flexibility sometimes needed!
;^)

Jim

No. but they should be there when you spend that much

Regards
Andy

Jim Ford
18th April 2008, 05:08 PM
No. but they should be there when you spend that much


So by the same token, we should have a 'Point and Shoot' mode on the E3?

Jim

shenstone
18th April 2008, 05:47 PM
So by the same token, we should have a 'Point and Shoot' mode on the E3?

Jim

Yes and you do it's ... Program mode Automatic with the live view read screen. that's P&S in my mind.it's the mode you adopt when you want the ultimate grab shot with little time to think about anything more - not an everyday tool, but sometimes the easiest and will get you a good result

Don't get me wrong it's not that Adobe don't put out some powerful tools, but that people struggle to work with them because they think they have to because that's all the mags talk about. I've used just about everything out there and still do and I still use a number of adobe products. I just tend to post the alternatives because there are so many people posting how to do this in PS and/or LR and there are things that are better for specific jobs in other toolsets.

The Adobe stranglehold in the photo software is for the same reasons as CanNikon in the cameras ... Just market share and media domination. I try and stay with a wider toolset and open mind and use whatever will do the job best.

Regards
Andy

andym
18th April 2008, 09:46 PM
My big problem was that I had the wire between the bottom two sails(see my post Stansted mountfitchet windmill) that ran more or less parallel with the telphone wire,the more the wire came to the left the closer it came to the wire between the sails and eventually converged with it.I found this very hard to deal with.

Any more ideas.

shenstone
18th April 2008, 09:55 PM
My big problem was that I had the wire between the bottom two sails(see my post Stansted mountfitchet windmill) that ran more or less parallel with the telphone wire,the more the wire came to the left the closer it came to the wire between the sails and eventually converged with it.I found this very hard to deal with.

Any more ideas.

Andy

I've looked at it now and despite my comments re strightforward scratch tool removal there is no real alternative to some real careful clone work in cases like that where complex backgrounds are involved.

I had one stunner of a shot of a foxglove that I had to spend about an hour removing a spiders web I hadn't seen until the flash lit it up like a neon sign once I looked on my PC screen.

You did a tidy job so I suspect you know the technique quite well

Regards
Andy