PDA

View Full Version : Image Stabilisation


abacus180
11th July 2011, 07:52 AM
I have a new E620, the first camera I've had with IS. I'm not sure whether this function actually does anything. I have it set to IS1, the 2D setting but I haven't noticed any improvement at all.
Is there a simple test I can perform, switching IS off then on, to see if there is a difference?
Thanks,
Graham

Tordan58
11th July 2011, 09:17 AM
Hi

You could setup and run a test similar to what Wrotniak (http://www.wrotniak.net/photo/tech/is-m.html)did a few years ago.
I did it on a E620 and with telezooms (http://e-group.uk.net/forum/showthread.php?t=14885)and found the IS helping with around 1EV - however the test has some flaws.

/Tord

Melaka
11th July 2011, 09:20 AM
Views on the value of IS vary but most reckon it is a good thing. This is especially so if you are obliged to use a shutter speed slower than the focal length of the lens. In consequence I find I use it mainly with longer focal length lenses. It shold be off if you are using a tripod.

Olybirder
11th July 2011, 10:16 AM
I leave IS1 on all the time on my E-30. I don't know if that is a bad thing but I find it is quite effective at slower shutter speeds. It is, of course, of no help if the subject itself is moving.

Ron

Tordan58
11th July 2011, 10:31 AM
I leave IS1 on all the time on my E-30. I don't know if that is a bad thing but I find it is quite effective at slower shutter speeds. It is, of course, of no help if the subject itself is moving.

Ron
Hi,
I have IS.1 on except when camera is mounted on tripod. Recently I have also started to turn it off when photographing subjects in motion such as birds in flight. This procedure may sound strange but I was recommended to do by a fellow photographer who claimed the IS had negative impact on the AF performance. He may have been right, I get the feeling I get higher yield of focused pictures compared to before. Objective tests that confirm what is right or wrong are difficult to set up though, so I leave it open ...
/Tord

zuiko-holic
11th July 2011, 11:08 AM
IS is for me the most valuable technical feature of my Olympus bodies.

I can easily shoot at speeds 1/13 with WA and normal lenses and 1/50 with telephotos.

IS will help not only in slow shutter speeds but for static subjects it allows you to keep ISO values as low as possible which is a great advantage, especially with MF lenses which I very often use.

Ian
11th July 2011, 11:35 AM
I have just been chatting to one of our hire customers who has one of our E-5s. He has been photographing aircraft and while not strictly panning, he has been pointing a 50-200 and a moving aircraft in the sky and he found he got much better results after switching IS off.

My feeling is that if you are photographing a static subject an you are trying to keep the camera as still as possible, IS is a very beneficial thing when shooting hand-held. But if you are waving the camera around and tracking moving subjects, unless you are panning horizontally (in which case you should use IS Mode 2) then I would think that there was a danger of the IS getting very confused and potentially contributing additional blur.

I'd be very interested to hear from others' experiences on this point.

Ian

Ian
11th July 2011, 11:37 AM
I have a new E620, the first camera I've had with IS. I'm not sure whether this function actually does anything. I have it set to IS1, the 2D setting but I haven't noticed any improvement at all.
Is there a simple test I can perform, switching IS off then on, to see if there is a difference?
Thanks,
Graham

If you are shooting at a low shutter speed hand-held you will see a difference between IS and non IS shots.

I wrote this article on the subject some time ago:

http://fourthirds-user.com/2007/07/olympus_e510_image_stabilisation_examined.php

Ian

David Morison
11th July 2011, 01:58 PM
I have just been chatting to one of our hire customers who has one of our E-5s. He has been photographing aircraft and while not strictly panning, he has been pointing a 50-200 and a moving aircraft in the sky and he found he got much better results after switching IS off.

My feeling is that if you are photographing a static subject an you are trying to keep the camera as still as possible, IS is a very beneficial thing when shooting hand-held. But if you are waving the camera around and tracking moving subjects, unless you are panning horizontally (in which case you should use IS Mode 2) then I would think that there was a danger of the IS getting very confused and potentially contributing additional blur.

I'd be very interested to hear from others' experiences on this point.

Ian

Yes I agree, when I am photographing a bird on the ground or in a tree etc. I use IS1 but if I am trying to get a bird in flight then it is always off. I also find it works better if I am not trying too hard to keep my hand steady, in other words if the camera shake is exaggerated the IS is more able to do it's job.

David

Greytop
11th July 2011, 02:48 PM
I also agree, when trying to photograph moving objects, aircraft, birds, vehicles etc I get much better results upping the shutter speed and turning IS off.
IS is great for (very) slow or stationary targets :)