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Ian
28th June 2011, 07:49 AM
Here is a summary or excerpt from an article I have just completed that has just been published on DPNow:

Panoramas are big pictures made from several smaller ones, usually forming a very low profile wide view. The aim is to create a new picture that doesn't reveal its constituent parts. Panoramas can make an otherwise unassuming scene very dramatic. We have great tips on how to make super panoramas and show how to do it in Photoshop Elements 9.

Click here to read the whole article... (http://dpnow.com/8110.html)

The sample images used were all taken in Skye (outside Seonnaidh's house!) on the recent members' meet, using an E-5 and 9-18 lens.

Ian

sponner
28th June 2011, 07:59 AM
That's great, thanks, I'm hoping to have a go at this soon.

Did I read somewhere that Olympus have a utility to make panorama's if using an XD card?

Ian
28th June 2011, 08:01 AM
That's great, thanks, I'm hoping to have a go at this soon.

Did I read somewhere that Olympus have a utility to make panorama's if using an XD card?

That was for their compacts - I have never tried it, so have no idea if it's any good.

Ian

jamie allan
28th June 2011, 01:21 PM
That was for their compacts - I have never tried it, so have no idea if it's any good.

Ian

Ian,
The e-410 and e-600 manuals have a detail on p41 and p42 respectively on how to execute in camera panoramas. I'd assume the e-620 will have the same.

Sponner,
I tried it first with a non Olympus xD card and it didn't work. I then bought an Olympus xD card off eBay and it also didn't work. I think the xD card needs to be an Olympus type M+ if I remember what I read up correctly. I gave up and have used Adobe Photoshop CS3 for doing panoramas.

meach
28th June 2011, 01:32 PM
Ian,
The e-410 and e-600 manuals have a detail on p41 and p42 respectively on how to execute in camera panoramas. I'd assume the e-620 will have the same.



p42 for the E-620 as well.

stoates
28th June 2011, 03:56 PM
Thanks for this Ian.

I tried my first 'pano' at the Braes on Skye, 9 landscape orientation shots on a tripod covering about 150deg. Unfortunately neither Microsoft ICE or Elements 9 will stitch 2 of the images together (and unfortunately pretty much the middle two) even though I am sure I had a consistent overlap on each image. Reading your article though, I think I was quite a bit shy of the recommended 'Overlap your shots consistently by about a third of the width of the frame' so Im guessing this is the issue.

Ah well, always the Highland Meet 2 at some point to try again!

catkins
28th June 2011, 06:04 PM
Thanks for this Ian.

I tried my first 'pano' at the Braes on Skye, 9 landscape orientation shots on a tripod covering about 150deg. Unfortunately neither Microsoft ICE or Elements 9 will stitch 2 of the images together (and unfortunately pretty much the middle two) even though I am sure I had a consistent overlap on each image. Reading your article though, I think I was quite a bit shy of the recommended 'Overlap your shots consistently by about a third of the width of the frame' so Im guessing this is the issue.

Ah well, always the Highland Meet 2 at some point to try again!

Overlap fails are often more to do with whether there are enough obvious identifying points in the two overlapping images, so allowing a third will be sensible on a featureless landscape panorama whereas a smaller overlap could work with no problem on an urban townscape panorama. A flat seascape with no obvious identifying features and a 75% overlap could still fail. So it's worth getting used to identifying whether the whole scene has obvious identifying points or not - if few, then give a bigger overlap, if loads throughout the scene then a smaller overlap may be fine.

You could also try uploading the images and set the task for us to stitch it for you - some of us may have software that will be able to set suitable identifying points within both images.
Otherwise, what editing software have you got, and could you use layers within a master image for each image in the panorama and then manually overlap and edit/trim to create the panorama?

Regards
Chris

Chevvyf1
28th June 2011, 07:01 PM
Ian GREAT STUFF ! I posted a ? asking about this a week or two ago ! *chr

sponner
28th June 2011, 08:20 PM
p42 for the E-620 as well.

RTFM i suppose :) , chhers for that I'll dig it out.

Definitely going to give these a try having seen some of teh results on these boards.

stoates
28th June 2011, 09:46 PM
Overlap fails are often more to do with whether there are enough obvious identifying points in the two overlapping images, so allowing a third will be sensible on a featureless landscape panorama whereas a smaller overlap could work with no problem on an urban townscape panorama. A flat seascape with no obvious identifying features and a 75% overlap could still fail. So it's worth getting used to identifying whether the whole scene has obvious identifying points or not - if few, then give a bigger overlap, if loads throughout the scene then a smaller overlap may be fine.

You could also try uploading the images and set the task for us to stitch it for you - some of us may have software that will be able to set suitable identifying points within both images.
Otherwise, what editing software have you got, and could you use layers within a master image for each image in the panorama and then manually overlap and edit/trim to create the panorama?

Regards
Chris

Thanks for all the gen Chris. I hadn't considered in the slightest the need for a larger overlap for less detailed scenes, I now know for the next time!

I will revisit the images to see if it is worth another attempt at processing myself (I have Elements 9 and can probably stitch my 9 images into 2 halves automatically then try a manual join on the 'broken' bit) or otherwise take you up on your offer of trying some other method/software for me. *chr

wanderer
28th June 2011, 10:20 PM
Last Thursday I was sent out to take some panoramas for 2 visitor boards at Dumbarton Castle. I went a bit over the top. The brief was a bright sunny day (got that) and lots of detail, particularly at distance. All but one sets taken with camera in portrait format. Lots of overlap. 4 with the 50-200 at 200, 9 to 11 shots each. 2 big ones which just about broke the office computer. One of 42 shots in 2 rows and one of 87 shots in 5 rows tapering from 21 to 5 images. I'll try and put one up when I get back to the office.
The files were heading for a Giga byte.:D

catkins
28th June 2011, 10:39 PM
Last Thursday I was sent out to take some panoramas for 2 visitor boards at Dumbarton Castle. I went a bit over the top. The brief was a bright sunny day (got that) and lots of detail, particularly at distance. All but one sets taken with camera in portrait format. Lots of overlap. 4 with the 50-200 at 200, 9 to 11 shots each. 2 big ones which just about broke the office computer. One of 42 shots in 2 rows and one of 87 shots in 5 rows tapering from 21 to 5 images. I'll try and put one up when I get back to the office.
The files were heading for a Giga byte.:D

I can feel a boasting from me which will very quickly and easily be beaten by many others in the gigapixel panorama world!
My record panorama was a very large 360 gigapan using 704 images of Hexham Abbey's interior. A re-stitching with updated software took about 1 hours as opposed to 15 hours for the first beta test stitching, plus 5 hours to upload! Fortunately that was done with a compact camera, and I still hope that someone will rent out a Gigapan Epic Pro for me to try with the Oly E-30.
The Abbey panorama was about 1.40 gigapixels but I think the world's largest currently is about 80 gigapixels made up of 7886 images!! Time for me to make a hasty retreat from the competition I guess or else I'll have one very dead computer.

Regards
Chris