PDA

View Full Version : Exposure Compensation


CallaWolf
24th June 2011, 09:06 AM
Something that I picked up from this interesting discussion
http://e-group.uk.net/forum/showthread.php?t=14874

My camera is usually permanently set to -1/3EV to keep shutter speeds up and ISO down.

In the above discussion, the OP dials in a +1EV

I'm not sure if mine is the best approach - any advice?

I shoot in raw using an E5, EPL-1 and now an E1

Ian
24th June 2011, 09:11 AM
I advocate not under-exposing in normal circumstances and there is even evidence that judicial over-exposure can be beneficial. It's explained here on my DPNow blog:

http://dpnow.com/forum2/blog.php?b=70

Ian

CallaWolf
24th June 2011, 09:18 AM
Thanks Ian - I've just sent you a PM

Kiwi Paul
24th June 2011, 09:22 AM
Interesting article Ian.
That only applies if shooting RAW though, if shooting jpg then it's best to ensure the exposure is correct at the time of shooting I imagine.

Paul

Swordfish
24th June 2011, 04:47 PM
I too used to set exp compensation to underexpose by 1/3rd or 1/2 EV for the same reasons.

Eventually I realised noise was becoming a problem more often than I liked so now I routinely overexpose by a similar amount and get better results more of the time.

snaarman
24th June 2011, 05:58 PM
I too used to set exp compensation to underexpose by 1/3rd or 1/2 EV for the same reasons.

Eventually I realised noise was becoming a problem more often than I liked so now I routinely overexpose by a similar amount and get better results more of the time.

Yep. My 620 is set to +1/2 permanently :)

Zuiko
24th June 2011, 07:56 PM
I choose how I'm going to expose according to my subject. If I'm shooting a landscape, using a tripod, I take an exposure without correction then check the histogram. I'll then adjust exposure if needed, usually by shifting exposure until the histogram shows the full range of highlights are being recorded without quite clipping, unless its the sort of dark, moody image where you would expect the histogram to bunch to the left.

The reason for generally preferring to expose to the right is that (providing they aren't clipped) highlights can usually be adjusted with less degradation than shadows. Lifting shadows creates noise, particularly if you are using a high ISO setting but it can cause problems even at low ISO settings.

Sometimes the light is changing too quickly to afford this luxury; then I just bracket +/- in 0.7 stop increments as quickly as possible. Or if, say, you want to bracket but with two plus values in addition to the unaltered metered exposure, you can set the compensation to + 0.7 stop and the auto bracket to 3 frame +/- 0.7. That will give you a sequence of + 0.7, + 1.3, 0. The same, of course, can be done to get two minus values plus 0.

If its a moving subject in unpredictable light I set 5fps and 3 frame auto bracket. If it's a fast moving but ongoing event in stable light (such as motorcycle grass track racing), photographed from the same position, I take a few test exposures, check the histogram and adjust compensation accordingly. No need to bracket now, the light should be consistant enough for the set exposure and you don't risk getting the best shot from a sequence on an over or under exposed frame.

These are just a few of the ways you can keep control of what the camera is doing by exposing intelligently and using as much or as little automation as you wish. Sometimes it just means tricking the camera into doing what you want it to, rather than letting it have a mind of its own. :)

Kiwi Paul
24th June 2011, 08:04 PM
I also adjust exposure compensation according to the scene. On my E3 and E5 the thumbwheel is set to adjust this so it's quick and easy to adjust as req.

Here's a shot I took this evening. The first is standard exposure and the second 2 stops under, even then the sky is still slightly over blown in places. Using a grad filter would be applicable here but I didn't have one.
The sky was unrecoverable in the first shot.
So really you just have to judge for yourself and use the histogram and highlight warning to understand whats going on with the exposure and adjust to suit.

These were shot in RAW and processed in LR3.

Paul

https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/-T7hBsiGVpk4/TgTr9Ol3S5I/AAAAAAAACsA/VIliX7CJTIs/P6243296.jpg

https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/-8LoeEP3znLE/TgTr-7fNWKI/AAAAAAAACsI/Gdw4-ILOmc0/P6243298.jpg