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mcwill
25th May 2011, 09:08 PM
A quick question if I may, I've hired Ian's E-5 to use alongside my E-620 at a sports event on Saturday.

Not counting the CF card in my E-620 the only spare memory cards I have are a 512MB CF card and a couple of 1GB SD cards so I think I need to acquire an extra memory card before Saturday. Any recommendations? Would it be better to get a CF or an SD card and what speed would you suggest?

Thanks,
Iain

francois
25th May 2011, 09:39 PM
Current CF are faster. SD are cheaper. A class 10 SD gives you 200x speed whilst the current crop of CF cards give you 600x.

For the basics:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Comparison_of_memory_cards

Good article on the subject:

http://www.luminous-landscape.com/reviews/accessories/photofast.shtml

Melaka
26th May 2011, 06:02 AM
You can use a CF in any Oly DSLR so that's probably the best to go for. Having said that I'm slowly converting to SD because there's a slot for them, but not CF, in my laptop. For a tenner or so you can get an adapter which enables you to use an SD in a CF slot.

mcwill
26th May 2011, 07:47 AM
Thanks for the responses, I know that in my E-620 the perceived wisdom is to use CF as the xD cards are very slow in comparison but that doesn't seem to be a problem with SD vs CF.

Like yourself David I do have an SD slot in the laptop so that combined with the cheaper cost (did I mention I was Scottish) means I'll probably go this route.

Iain

Ian
26th May 2011, 08:43 AM
Not all CFs are 600x - you need to check the speed rating on the individual card. UDMA type cards will give you a speed rating from 233x to 600x.

The E-5 will benefit from the extra speed of UDMA cards, but not the E-620. And you need a UDMA-capable card reader to get the performance boost when copying to a PC.

These articles might help:

http://dpnow.com/4445.html

http://dpnow.com/5305.html

http://dpnow.com/6539.html

Ian

mcwill
26th May 2011, 08:57 AM
Thanks Ian, however I've elected to go down the SD route and ended up ordering one of these from Amazon...

http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/B004JJU6I4

I get free next day delivery with Amazon so it makes it a reasonable buy.

Changing the subject completely, is the E-5 covered by the Olympus Hire rebate if I purchase one? (I really like the large viewfinder compared to the E-620).

Iain

Ian
26th May 2011, 08:59 AM
Thanks Ian, however I've elected to go down the SD route and ended up ordering one of these from Amazon...

http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/B004JJU6I4

I get free next day delivery with Amazon so it makes it a reasonable buy.

Changing the subject completely, is the E-5 covered by the Olympus Hire rebate if I purchase one? (I really like the large viewfinder compared to the E-620).

Iain

Yes, I confirmed with Olympus yesterday that we will renew the rebate scheme until the end of September, when we will re-evaluate it then.

Ian

francois
26th May 2011, 10:18 AM
The E-5 will benefit from the extra speed of UDMA cards, but not the E-620.

What about the E-3, will a fast CF card make a difference? Say a 600x instead of a 133x.

Besides the speed, there's also the question of size. I'm thinking of getting a 16Gb card to be able to have just the one card with me and more than enough to shoot.

Ian
26th May 2011, 10:30 AM
What about the E-3, will a fast CF card make a difference? Say a 600x instead of a 133x.

Besides the speed, there's also the question of size. I'm thinking of getting a 16Gb card to be able to have just the one card with me and more than enough to shoot.

Yes, the E-3, E-30, and E-5 are all UDMA compatible. I use a 16GB Lexar Pro UDMA 600 CF card.

I would recommend the cheaper UDMA 233 or 300 cards as 600x doesn't make a lot of difference.

Ian

francois
26th May 2011, 10:57 AM
Surely the higher burst transfer rate must make a difference if the cameras are UDMA compatible? I'm thinking particularly when the buffer is full, and also if you select to save RAW + Fine.

Ian
26th May 2011, 11:25 AM
Surely the higher burst transfer rate must make a difference if the cameras are UDMA compatible? I'm thinking particularly when the buffer is full, and also if you select to save RAW + Fine.

Yes, but the advantage is very small - maybe one frame in acontinuous high speed burst before the buffer stalls. Just because the card is rated as twice as fast doesn't mean the burst rate will be twice as long in terms of frames before the buffer stalls. There are other bottlenecks.

Ian

Naughty Nigel
28th May 2011, 08:18 PM
Yes, but the advantage is very small - maybe one frame in acontinuous high speed burst before the buffer stalls. Just because the card is rated as twice as fast doesn't mean the burst rate will be twice as long in terms of frames before the buffer stalls. There are other bottlenecks.

Ian

I was going to say; the speed advantage of CF cards will only be realised if you are shooting at maximum burst rate. It will make no difference if you are shooting single frames.

I like to leave CF cards in my cameras at all times, as they are small and easily lost, and the connector pins are quite delicate and easily damaged. SD cards are more robust if you like to take your cards out of the camera regularly.

francois
29th May 2011, 05:37 PM
Yes, but the advantage is very small...

With the camera, that is true. But it is useful when you plug the CF into a multireader to transfer the pics on your PC, which is what I do (rarely connect the camera to the PC, aside from firmware upgrade).

Melaka
29th May 2011, 07:21 PM
Besides the speed, there's also the question of size. I'm thinking of getting a 16Gb card to be able to have just the one card with me and more than enough to shoot.

There's a school of thought that says you are better off with several smaller cards rather than one big one. If a card goes defective you lose only a proportion of your pix rather than the whole lot. I have several small ones and change them on a daily basis when I'm away from home so as to give me some insurance.

francois
29th May 2011, 09:42 PM
You've got a point.