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View Full Version : filter or not to filter that is the question


monoboard
8th February 2011, 08:14 PM
Hi folks
On a oly 12-60 swd lens any recomendations for a filter for use in the great outdoors probley on snow. I would normaly have just gone for UV with the snow and also protection to the lens!

reg

monoboard

benvendetta
8th February 2011, 10:24 PM
I would just use a UV or Skylight for protection, although a polariser may give you a deeper blue sky. I do find though that using digital often gives me naturally polarised skys anyway.

Ellie
9th February 2011, 11:50 PM
I use a UV filter on all my lenses, although a lot of people say it's a waste of time and can cause lens flare. It probably isn't a good idea to go for the cheapest available ones though, not if you've spent a lot on a good quality lens.

Ross the fiddler
10th February 2011, 09:17 AM
I use a UV filter on all my lenses, although a lot of people say it's a waste of time and can cause lens flare. It probably isn't a good idea to go for the cheapest available ones though, not if you've spent a lot on a good quality lens.

I agree. Make sure it is a reputable brand with (double or whatever) coating for best results.

monoboard
29th April 2011, 03:42 PM
Just been looking on a web site for a filter for my 12-60 lens, any recomendations between these two, Hoyo HD digital uv filter or a Hoya HD digital circular polarising filter and what differnt results they would give.

monoboard

gwpics
29th April 2011, 03:51 PM
In 40 years of photography I have never put a UV/Skylight filter on the front of a lens as a fixture and have never damaged a lens yet. A polariser is a great idea if the light is right, but make sure it is a good one. Hoya HD are good but I prefer B+W if available.

Gerry

Nick Temple-Fry
29th April 2011, 04:05 PM
Just been looking on a web site for a filter for my 12-60 lens, any recomendations between these two, Hoyo HD digital uv filter or a Hoya HD digital circular polarising filter and what differnt results they would give.

monoboard

Well they are 2 very different beasts.

A UV filter obstructs a very limited set of light wavelengths (depending on the strength of the filter). Typically a 'general purpose' UV filter will have very little visual effect, a stronger UV filter (which may well have a yellowish tinge to it) may have some impact on the scene reducing the blue/violet end of the spectrum leading to a slightly 'warmer' colour cast.

A polarising filter restricts light according to the angle of polarisation, so it will tend to dim a scene. Where light is polarised by reflection (which happens with water, pure even snow, and many non-metallic surfaces) then that light will be reduced more dependant on the alignment of the filter (which rotates) and the plane of the reflecting surface.

So for general use you are probably better off with a UV filter for most purposes (if you insist on having a filter), however it is always useful to have a polarising filter available.

(snow scenes with bright sunlight may be a case where a polarising filter is useful)

Nick

Ross the fiddler
30th April 2011, 12:32 AM
So for general use you are probably better off with a UV filter for most purposes (if you insist on having a filter), however it is always useful to have a polarising filter available.Nick

*laugh Some of us do insist on having the filter on. It just makes me feel better like having a bull bar on the front of a 4WD (in Australia the kangaroos can do a lot of damage to the front of a car if you're unlucky to hit one at dusk).