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shenstone
16th March 2008, 06:52 PM
Following some links from a thread started by PeterD they rekindled an old memory on a Sutcliff Essay I had seen some time ago.

Given this forum section I thought that should be posted for all of us to read and consider how much or how little things have changed. so ...

A sixteen hundred word essay on 'What Makes a Good Photograph' written by Frank Meadow Sutcliffe, Hon. F.R.P.S. for "Photography" magazine of 28th June 1894....
A somewhat tongue in cheek comparison of the layman's view compared with that of the professional photographer - quite entertaining.

There are some wonderful comments on white balance!!:D

Enjoy !

http://www.sutcliffephotographs.com/ph894f28htm.htm

Regards
Andy

PeterD
16th March 2008, 07:47 PM
Following some links from a thread started by PeterD they rekindled an old memory on a Sutcliff Essay I had seen some time ago.

Given this forum section I thought that should be posted for all of us to read and consider how much or how little things have changed. so ...



There are some wonderful comments on white balance!!:D

Enjoy !

http://www.sutcliffephotographs.com/ph894f28htm.htm

Regards
Andy

Andy,

Thanks for the posting and, you are right, a good read which reflects even todays views on photography'

The yellow problem was of course the indication of the start of a fading print and it seems perfectly reasonable for the general public to try and avoid it. Its one of those things that, no matter how hard you try. you would have difficulty in selling these images.

He touches on another point and that is hard images are popular, This same argument is happening today. We have been conditioned to see high contrast images and have been told that these are the very best images and there is no place for softness at all. I certainly do not hold with this view. I think that a picture should convey its own mood and that this is not entirely down to the subject but the colours and sharpness (or otherwise) go to complement it and re-enforce the mood.

I believe, as he does, that we are getting lost in looking for technical perfection driven by a narrow set of rules. Yes, we should strive for sharp images and detail but, we should not let this be our only goal. If we wish to create a picture worthy of being framed and hung on a wall, we should take the view of how the composition works and how does it look from say 1 foot away and NOT under the magnifying glass.

Just my thoughts

PeterD

Scapula Memory
17th March 2008, 09:13 AM
A very interesting read, and nicely summed up by Peter. Certainly thought provoking thanks for posting the link.