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View Full Version : HELP! aperture advice 50-200


Kittykat23uk
4th January 2011, 01:26 PM
Hi everyone I'm in need of some advie please. I find when I'm shooting wildlife I tend to just dial in the lowest F stop I can get in order to keep the shutter speed up as high as possible and the ISO as low as possible. But is there any situation where you wouldn't do that, for shooting birds and other wildlife? Examples would be very helpful.

Thanks,

Jo

benvendetta
4th January 2011, 01:41 PM
Well, if you are using the lens close to birds then using it near to wide open will give a very shallow depth of field. Stopping down a good few stops would improve things no end - but you would need to up the ISO to keep a fastish shutter speed.
With more distant subjects this would be less of an issue as there will be more depth of field available, even at large apertures. Although the 50-200 has pretty decent IQ wide open it will be better stopped down a bit.
Although I try and use ISO100 whenever I can, I do find that 800 isn't too bad on the E-3 (probably much better on the E-5 and even higher values), and of course you are more likely to get the shot that you are after.

Kittykat23uk
4th January 2011, 02:08 PM
Hi thans for the advice. I should add, I'm using an E620. :)

Who's_E
4th January 2011, 02:09 PM
Another consideration is that you don't have to have the fastest shutter speed available with bird photography. Slowing the shutter down can add to the drama of an action photo.

With that in mind, I often aim for 1/640th or 1/800th of a second. I start (mostly) on ISO 100 and F7.1 to see what that gives me. In poor light I move onto ISO 400. Then I start the process of opening the aperture until I get the speed I want.

I generally take photos on light days so I have the luxury of flexibility over the aperture and ISO.

Nick

Dogcow
4th January 2011, 02:47 PM
Isn't ISO 200 the default ISO for the E-620 sensor?
If so, you wouldn't benefit in lowering it to ISO 100.

Bikie John
4th January 2011, 02:47 PM
Stopping down for depth of field is a mixed blessing. Wide open you get very little depth on the subject, but the background is very blurred. Stop down for more depth on the subject and the background can become much clearer - this can be distracting and mean that the subject does not stand out so clearly.

For sports I generally shoot wide open in order to freeze action and blur the background as much as poss. As Nick Who's_E says you may not want to freeze the action completely, it depends on the subject. In the end you just have to try it all ways up and see what suits you. Which doesn't help answer the original question much, sorry :p

IQ-wise I find the 50-200 fine wide open, with or without the 1.4* converter, but it does give darker corners. These are easy to fix, specially if you process from raw.

Ciao ... John

StephenL
4th January 2011, 03:11 PM
The advise I was given by an Olympus employee for shooting animals, at least in captivity, is to pick your subject and isolate it by shooting wide open. On the 50-200 especially, you won't lose any appreciable definition in the centre of the frame,

Kittykat23uk
4th January 2011, 03:33 PM
Thanks for the great tips. Could you sare your technique for getting over the dark corners in your shots please? I've noticed that in some of mine, especially when I was using a UV filter- so much so that I stopped using the filter as that seemed to make it worse.

I'm mainly into wildlife not captive birds and animals (except with some falconry practice shots) so we are dealing with some distances involved, I tend to use the lens with the EC14.

Wally
4th January 2011, 03:53 PM
If you find filters give problems... Modern lens don't suffer many of the problems of older lens - meaning soft glass. With harder glass and anti-scratch coatings you could, in many instances, not use a filter at all. Obviously, there will be some areas where a filter would be required such as beaches, deserts, locations with high humidity or at sea with salt spray etc. With the modern care tools readily available, keeping the lens clean is much easier than it was when I were a lad and used my tie as a cleaning cloth. ;)

photo_owl
4th January 2011, 04:08 PM
The advise I was given by an Olympus employee for shooting animals, at least in captivity, is to pick your subject and isolate it by shooting wide open. On the 50-200 especially, you won't lose any appreciable definition in the centre of the frame,

But as Dave has already highlighted, you can get significantly less than your bird in focus with this lens wide open!

Whilst this is obvious with large birds it can equally apply to tiny ones (Robins spring to mind) that get up close.

Wide open can give you a tiny dof, here's one with the EC14 so f4.9 where I wish I had given it more thought (and maybe f6.3 :))

http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2204/2172082331_dc4322487f_o.jpg



Sometimes even f8 isn't enough - although this was taken with the 7-14 the physics is the same

http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2384/2372379272_2186187cb0_o.jpg

Bikie John
4th January 2011, 04:50 PM
Jo asks

Could you sare your technique for getting over the dark corners in your shots please?

If it's not too noticeable I don't bother, if the central subject is strong the darker corners might not matter. If it needs correcting, I will usually resort to the raw file rather than the JPEG (I always shoot both together). I normally use Adobe Camera Raw (ACR) for converting raw files, it has a tab for lens adjustments which includes a simple slider for vignetting. This works quite well and it's easy to see what it's doing.

I've just had a look at Oly Viewer 2, it seems to offer something similar in its raw processor under Basic2/Shading Compensation. However, I couldn't get it to apply enough correction on one example, maybe I missed something.

It shouldn't be too difficult to use your image editor to lighten the corners on the OOC JPEGs. The details will vary from one editor to another though - which do you use?

I don't use filters except to keep rain/snow/hail off the front of the lens. I would rather have to clean a xx filter than a yyy lens!

Ciao ... John

Who's_E
4th January 2011, 05:14 PM
Isn't ISO 200 the default ISO for the E-620 sensor?
If so, you wouldn't benefit in lowering it to ISO 100.

Sorry, not sure about the E620. I was talking about the E3 and I think I must have been typing at the same time but posted marginally after Jo.

Nick

Kittykat23uk
5th January 2011, 08:30 AM
Hi john, thanks for the tips. I use photoshop CS2 and also have the olympus software that came with the camera.

Ross the fiddler
5th January 2011, 09:36 AM
Jo asks



If it's not too noticeable I don't bother, if the central subject is strong the darker corners might not matter. If it needs correcting, I will usually resort to the raw file rather than the JPEG (I always shoot both together). I normally use Adobe Camera Raw (ACR) for converting raw files, it has a tab for lens adjustments which includes a simple slider for vignetting. This works quite well and it's easy to see what it's doing.

I've just had a look at Oly Viewer 2, it seems to offer something similar in its raw processor under Basic2/Shading Compensation. However, I couldn't get it to apply enough correction on one example, maybe I missed something.

It shouldn't be too difficult to use your image editor to lighten the corners on the OOC JPEGs. The details will vary from one editor to another though - which do you use?

I don't use filters except to keep rain/snow/hail off the front of the lens. I would rather have to clean a xx filter than a yyy lens!

Ciao ... John

My E30 also has that as an option in the menu to select which was also suggested by Wrotniak to leave on. Does the E620 have that option too?

Ross the fiddler
5th January 2011, 09:46 AM
Sorry, not sure about the E620. I was talking about the E3 and I think I must have been typing at the same time but posted marginally after Jo.

Nick

The E30 is ISO 200 which can be determined from what the minimum auto ISO is & this should apply to the E620 too (whatever it is).