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Rod Souter
23rd November 2007, 10:37 PM
Hi,

I've just taken delivery of my new camera, what alterations should I make to the out the box default settings to obtain the best results for a newbie to DSLR?

Regards

Rod

Ian
23rd November 2007, 11:16 PM
Hi,

I've just taken delivery of my new camera, what alterations should I make to the out the box default settings to obtain the best results for a newbie to DSLR?

Regards

Rod

I would get to grips with RAW as soon as you can. I usually record RAW and JPEGs at the same time - RAW+SHQ.

I'd also set the AF to the one central point, use a set ISO speed instead of auto and maybe program the Fn button to switch to manual focus, which can be very handy at times.

Ian

Magnumaniac
24th November 2007, 12:12 AM
This link may help you (it did me):

http://www.wrotniak.net/photo/oly-e/e500-sett.html

Updated for E-510 now. Be warned, it is very long and a matter of personal opinion, but the explanations are clear enough that you should be able to make your own decisions.

Obviously there is no magic, one size fits all setup that makes the camera perform in every situation, but understanding what each option does will make it much easier to decide what is right in any given situation. It's a long road, but a fun ride :)

Ian.

Garrie
24th November 2007, 10:34 AM
I think the first thing I'll do when I get my E510 (monday) is to turn of the noise filter and reduce sharpness Accordingly.

Reading a few reviews of the E510 and E410 this noise filters seems to make pictures not as sharp as they should be at low ISO 100.

Cheers
G

Ian
24th November 2007, 11:29 AM
I think the first thing I'll do when I get my E510 (monday) is to turn of the noise filter and reduce sharpness Accordingly.

Reading a few reviews of the E510 and E410 this noise filters seems to make pictures not as sharp as they should be at low ISO 100.

Cheers
G

The noise filter is only critical for in-camera JPEGs. I find the standard setting is fine if I need to use camera JPEGs, but you can choose any level of noise filtering when processing the RAW image.

Ian

Garrie
24th November 2007, 12:14 PM
Cheers for clearing that up Ian, tbh I was a little worried about the noise filters but haven't got my E510 yet (arrives monday).

Was just reading this review (http://www.dpreview.com/reviews/olympuse510/) and it did have me concerned.

Ian
24th November 2007, 12:26 PM
Cheers for clearing that up Ian, tbh I was a little worried about the noise filters but haven't got my E510 yet (arrives monday).

Was just reading this review (http://www.dpreview.com/reviews/olympuse510/) and it did have me concerned.

Which bit of the review was of concern?

Ian

Garrie
24th November 2007, 12:33 PM
Just the noise filter bit, took me a while to get my head round it, was concerned I would be taking even more softer shots than usual.

Really looking forward to receiving the camera.

Ian
24th November 2007, 12:43 PM
Just the noise filter bit, took me a while to get my head round it, was concerned I would be taking even more softer shots than usual.

Really looking forward to receiving the camera.

The noise filter has a permanent effect on in-camera JPEGs, but if you record RAW files you can apply any degree of noise filtering during RAW processing, independently of the noise filter setting in the camera.

An introduction to RAW article is bubbling up now :D

Ian

Magnumaniac
24th November 2007, 01:20 PM
An introduction to RAW article is bubbling up now :D

Ian

Oh, yes please :)

Ian.

bobg
24th November 2007, 03:17 PM
Hi Rod,

I purchased an E-500 a few months ago, and found this useful site - if you follow the link to other articles on 'customizing your E-510' you may get some ideas from it.

http://www.wrotniak.net/photo/oly-e/e500-sett.html

Regards, bobg

Rod Souter
24th November 2007, 04:58 PM
Many thanks for all the replies, looks like a lot of reading (inc manual) followed by furtling with the settings:D

Ian can this Introduction to RAW now erupt?


Regards


Rod

beardedwombat
24th November 2007, 05:27 PM
There's nothing like sitting at home when its raining, having a good furtle!:D

Ian
24th November 2007, 07:32 PM
Many thanks for all the replies, looks like a lot of reading (inc manual) followed by furtling with the settings:D

Ian can this Introduction to RAW now erupt?


Regards


Rod

Give me a moment :rolleyes::D

Ian

PeterD
24th November 2007, 08:50 PM
Looking forward to the Intro to RAW Ian. Sounds very useful as I am going off recording Jpg only. RAW files will allow me to post process without loosing the original image - right?

Cheers

PeterD

Barr1e
24th November 2007, 10:06 PM
I am also looking forward to Ian's RAW item. I have felt that I would like to go down that route for the past couple of years and when researching for a good RAW converter got differing opinions on almost every site.

It would be interesting to hear which program members use.

Kindest regards. Barr1e

Ian
24th November 2007, 10:24 PM
I am also looking forward to Ian's RAW item. I have felt that I would like to go down that route for the past couple of years and when researching for a good RAW converter got differing opinions on almost every site.

It would be interesting to hear which program members use.

Kindest regards. Barr1e

Actually the free Olympus Master software is a good start. Olympus Studio is good and supports batch processing but it is slow and not as intuitive as I'd have liked. But it produces very high quality results and as it models your camera closely, the starting point is usually better than with independent solutions. Adobe Camera RAW, which is at the heart of Photoshop and Lightroom, is very powerful, fast and easy to use. It's a bargain with Photoshop Elements 6.0. Another package worth looking at is Bibble, which has powerful noise management features built in, as well as lens and other distortion paramenter corrections. LightSurf is another interesting package.

Ian

beardedwombat
24th November 2007, 11:46 PM
I reckon Bibble Lite is the easiest to use for someone new to RAW. It is very straightforward to use and much faster than Olympus Master. It incorporates Noise Ninja and a few other plugins too. I tend to use Lightroom most of the time mainly because I get excellent results but also I love the elegant UI and the fact that the panels glide from view leaving pretty much a full screen image and return when you hover over the side or bottom bars. ACDSee Pro is ok but not so intuitive as Bibble or Lightroom. Lightroom is however, a bit pricey.
Chris

ndl0071
26th November 2007, 03:09 PM
I too will be looking forward to Ians Raw article (no pressure Ian:))
I have dabbled with Raw using Adobe as the converter, but being self taught you never really know where you've cut corners, any pointers will be welcome.
Thanks Ian:)

PeterD
26th November 2007, 05:42 PM
Yes, I too have dabbled with RAW. The main downside is the slow download times with the E500.

Ian,

I have a quick look at Adobe both the Adobe products you mention. Which would you recommend, Elements or Lightroom?

Thanks

PeterD

ndl0071
27th November 2007, 08:52 AM
Hi Peter

I am surprised 'bout the slow download (or is it upload:confused:) on your 500, I have downloaded RAW from my C7070 and 510 and have not noticed a slow tranfer, not tried it on a 500 though so I cannot comment on that.
My thoughts on your software dilema is simply you get what you pay for, Lightroom is expensive but in my opinion worth the spend, even if you currently do not use all of the features you may well grow into them as you do the learning curve, paticulary with RAW in mind, also the file sorting features are superb with Lightroom. I use CS3 (still trying to get to grips with) but I believe some of the features are common across both packages.
Why not download the trial software from Adobe (30 days) and have a play:)

All the best

ndl

Ian
27th November 2007, 09:13 AM
I reckon Bibble Lite is the easiest to use for someone new to RAW. It is very straightforward to use and much faster than Olympus Master. It incorporates Noise Ninja and a few other plugins too. I tend to use Lightroom most of the time mainly because I get excellent results but also I love the elegant UI and the fact that the panels glide from view leaving pretty much a full screen image and return when you hover over the side or bottom bars. ACDSee Pro is ok but not so intuitive as Bibble or Lightroom. Lightroom is however, a bit pricey.
Chris

ACDSee is a very good thumbnail viewer - I wouldn't bother with the premium versions for their image editing capabilities though.

Ian

PeterD
27th November 2007, 10:01 AM
Hi Peter

I am surprised 'bout the slow download (or is it upload:confused:) on your 500, I have downloaded RAW from my C7070 and 510 and have not noticed a slow tranfer, not tried it on a 500 though so I cannot comment on that.
My thoughts on your software dilema is simply you get what you pay for, Lightroom is expensive but in my opinion worth the spend, even if you currently do not use all of the features you may well grow into them as you do the learning curve, paticulary with RAW in mind, also the file sorting features are superb with Lightroom. I use CS3 (still trying to get to grips with) but I believe some of the features are common across both packages.
Why not download the trial software from Adobe (30 days) and have a play:)

All the best

ndl

Thanks for the above.

Transfer speeds(E500) -Unfortunately the data transfer is slow because the camera only has a USB 1 interface. Terribly short sighted by Olympus, USB 2 has been around for ages!

Lightbox - I have read various reviews and came to the same conclusion that it would be worth a try. Downloaded it yesterday and played with it last night. Looks quite powerful and plenty of room for my skills to grow within it. I shall probably buy a book that covers its use as, although the editing controls seem straight forward, I want to give it a fair evaluation against my needs.

Best regards

PeterD

theMusicMan
27th November 2007, 03:40 PM
I have to say that when I connect my E-510 via USB to my Mac, the transfer speeds are very slow, whereas if I remove the card, place that in the reader and copy the files across to my external drive (also USB) this is much faster... probably twice the speed.

I use Lightroom and maybe this slows the process down... never been really happy with file transfer times on either my E-400 (which I appreciate is USB1) nor on my E-510 (USB2). Seems that it may be Lightroom that causes a slow down.

Ian
27th November 2007, 04:03 PM
I have to say that when I connect my E-510 via USB to my Mac, the transfer speeds are very slow, whereas if I remove the card, place that in the reader and copy the files across to my external drive (also USB) this is much faster... probably twice the speed.

I use Lightroom and maybe this slows the process down... never been really happy with file transfer times on either my E-400 (which I appreciate is USB1) nor on my E-510 (USB2). Seems that it may be Lightroom that causes a slow down.

Camera USB connections are generally quite a lot slower than good card readers, see:

http://dpnow.com/4445a.html (bottom of the page)

Ian

PeterD
27th November 2007, 04:13 PM
Camera USB connections are generally quite a lot slower than good card readers, see:

http://dpnow.com/4445a.html (bottom of the page)

Ian


Thanks Ian. Its what I thought but I had hoped the E3 would perform much better than the figures in the table. I have just bought one thinking this would not be an issue.

Now where is my wallet? Need a card reader........

PeterD

theMusicMan
27th November 2007, 08:45 PM
Thanks for the link Ian...