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Jim
10th March 2008, 12:54 PM
Came across this, http://www.olympus.co.uk/consumer/dslr_6839.htm

Mentions both the E-510 and E-520.

Olympus integrated a built-in image stabiliser into the camera body of the E-3, E-510 and E-520. It stabilises up to 5 EV steps (up to 4 EV steps with the E-510 and E-520), making it the most effective solution on the market.

andym
10th March 2008, 12:55 PM
Interesting.

Good Find

Garrie
10th March 2008, 01:29 PM
I thought the E-510 was still almost brand new to hit the streets, how long has it been out?

yorky
10th March 2008, 01:30 PM
It had to be didn't it. It put me off an E3 till I find out what improvements will be included in a 520. A better auto focus? A movable screen? I doubt if there would be anything else they could really do to improve on the 510! Oh just an after thought, the E3 viewfinder.

Jim
10th March 2008, 01:36 PM
I thought the E-510 was still almost brand new to hit the streets, how long has it been out?


E-510 was announced 5th March 2007.

mike_j
10th March 2008, 01:51 PM
Came across this, http://www.olympus.co.uk/consumer/dslr_6839.htm

Mentions both the E-510 and E-520.

Doesn't now - someone must have picked it up!!

Olympus integrated a built-in image stabiliser into the camera body of the E-3 and E-510.

Jim
10th March 2008, 02:29 PM
They were quick to react on that :)

Haisbro
19th March 2008, 07:53 AM
Came across this, http://www.olympus.co.uk/consumer/dslr_6839.htm

Mentions both the E-510 and E-520.

Here is some more info, scroll down about half way for some pics

http://babelfish.altavista.com/babelfish/trurl_pagecontent?lp=ja_en&url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.digitalcamera.jp

David

Jim
19th March 2008, 09:55 AM
Good find, I wonder just what timeframe we are looking at.

mewmew
20th March 2008, 10:11 PM
Good find, I wonder just what timeframe we are looking at.

I think its for sale late June.

mewmew
20th March 2008, 10:13 PM
http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3213/2344621073_2e6c5a7566_b.jpg

http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2326/2344559105_4dde8075a9_o.jpg

shenstone
21st March 2008, 09:56 AM
Well

At least the controls look identical to the E-510 which is good news. I have to admit that I was well annoyes when they moved a few things around (pointlessly IMHO) from the E-500. e.g. the flash pop up button which was in a much more ergonomic position, but I've learned to live with it

Regards
Andy

BigD
24th March 2008, 09:28 PM
hopefully it'll drive the 510 prices down so i can afford just the body :)

PeterD
24th March 2008, 10:10 PM
hopefully it'll drive the 510 prices down so i can afford just the body :)

Just as well I am not intending to sell my E500. Having had an extended session with it today alongside the E3, it reminded me how good a camera it is. Perhaps when the E550 comes out I shall be ready to replace it.;)

PeterD

BigD
24th March 2008, 10:16 PM
Just as well I am not intending to sell my E500. Having had an extended session with it today alongside the E3, it reminded me how good a camera it is. Perhaps when the E550 comes out I shall be ready to replace it.;)

PeterD

il keep mine as a backup i just want a body with IS for the long shots when im not carrying a tripod :)

PeterD
24th March 2008, 10:31 PM
il keep mine as a backup i just want a body with IS for the long shots when im not carrying a tripod :)

I always have the E500 with me and its fitted with the 12-60mm lens as lack of IS is not an issue at this focal length. Nature shots I take with the E3 and for wide angle shots I reach for the E500.

PeterD

BigD
24th March 2008, 10:33 PM
3 bodys :( one day maybe *yes

Garrie
25th March 2008, 04:07 PM
I hope the E520 is as good as the E500, I've been a little dissapointed with my E510 and I can't seem to put my finger on why :confused:

shenstone
25th March 2008, 06:53 PM
I always have the E500 with me and its fitted with the 12-60mm lens as lack of IS is not an issue at this focal length. Nature shots I take with the E3 and for wide angle shots I reach for the E500.

PeterD

Me too only the 510 not the E3.

I really still like both - it would need to be a stunning feature that made me upgrade.

Regards
Andy

Rockin Ronnie
12th April 2008, 01:03 AM
After I bought my E510, I went at little retro and purchased an E330. It should be arriving soon. Yes, I know it a little old but it is a very under-rated camera.

The E-520, or whatever it will be called, will certainly be evolutionary but not revolutionary!

Ron

j.baker
12th April 2008, 08:41 AM
I visited my local camera store (Great western cameras in Swindon yesterday) to try the Sigma 30mm F1.4. I did not purchase the lens as it could not focus correctly (the 2nd one from different suppliers with the same problem). Any way, I discussed the new 25mm pancake lens, and they may have some in stock next week.

They also said that the E520 will be in shortly......probably within 2-3 weeks(Maybe earlier).

They did not have any specification.....I did ask :D

I have reserved my 25mm Pancake :)

yorky
12th April 2008, 01:33 PM
Well lets hope the wait will be worth while! I can't really see that there can be very much improvement without compromising the E3? Surely they arn't about to do that so soon after its release--unless--they have a groundbreaking E4 in the pipeline? I wouldn't have thought there was much market for a new top end model yet after the release of the Pentax, Sony, Nikon etc, and I am sure Fuji are about to anounce a replacement for their top end model.

Graham_of_Rainham
12th April 2008, 03:30 PM
Olympus Law of Progression

OM1, OM2, OM4, OM3

E-1, E-3, therefore E-2 ;)

So long as they bring back Multi-Spot Metering :D

arbib
14th April 2008, 02:40 AM
Olympus Law of Progression

OM1, OM2, OM4, OM3

E-1, E-3, therefore E-2 ;)

So long as they bring back Multi-Spot Metering :D

Yes, I loved and used the Multispot metering on the OM4 I owned in the 80's..Wish I had kept it with the Oly TTL Twin Macro Flash I had with it and the Tokina 90mm Macro....:(

Steve Lane
14th April 2008, 10:06 AM
Here, Here for multi spot metering! I use it 99% of the time with my OM4ti & 3Ti's and miss it like crazy when I use my E-1. I am still confounded as to why Olympus have not introduced this into digital bodies yet. Maybe they are saving it for a future model...(here's hoping!)

Ian
14th April 2008, 10:19 AM
For the benefit of those that don't know what multi spot metering is, can you describe the differences to conventional spot and matrix metering and its advantages?

Anyone remember lower centre weighted metering? :)

Ian

Steve Lane
14th April 2008, 04:27 PM
Here goes...Multispot metering allows (in the case of my OM3/4Ti's) up to eight spot metering readings to be taken from anywhere in the frame, at the push of a button. The spot metering area is roughly 2% of the image area. Each time the spot metering button is pressed, the measurement is added to the camera's memory which calculates the overall light reading based on the values stored.

This is particulary useful when wishing to expose a scene that has bright highlights and deep shadows as it reduces the risk of overexposing the highlights, especially when using transparency film. It is also very useful as a method of calculating the lightest and darkest part of a scene, allowing the photographer to bias exposures somewhere between, depending on subject matter, or the effect required.

Where backlit subjects are concerned, two or three spot metering points taken from slightly different areas of the subject bring out detail that would otherwise be lost in shadow. Atmosphere is also retained that may be lost if a flash was used.

When used in conjuction with portraits, I tend to take a spot measurement from the subject's face, one from the hair, and sometimes one from the background. The is gives a 2-1 bias in favor of the subject over the background. If the portrait is a bit more than head and shoulders i.e 3/4 length, I would add an additional metering point from the clothing.

Macro photography benefits too; I recall taking a picture of a Nasturtuim flower in my garden that had an ant sat inside it. I used three spot metering points; one each for the flower's light and dark tones, and one for the ant. The result showed some detail retained in the ant that would have otherwise been lost had I not factored it into the exposure.

I must admit, I only ever used all eight metering points when I first got my 4Ti many years ago. I found that when I did, I ended up with very average exposures for which I might have well just used the camera's centre weighted average metering.

I think it would be a particularly useful feature to add to one (ore more!) of the E-System bodies, as it would allow a superb method of controlling blown out highlights and a very creative way of adding atmosphere to images. I had my fingers crossed it would be included in the E-3, but alas, no.

As for lower centre weighted metering, I have not head of it; is it a form of centre weighted metering that is biased toward shadow? What camera's used it?

Cheers, Steve.

Zuiko
14th April 2008, 08:56 PM
Here goes...Multispot metering allows (in the case of my OM3/4Ti's) up to eight spot metering readings to be taken from anywhere in the frame, at the push of a button. The spot metering area is roughly 2% of the image area. Each time the spot metering button is pressed, the measurement is added to the camera's memory which calculates the overall light reading based on the values stored.

This is particulary useful when wishing to expose a scene that has bright highlights and deep shadows as it reduces the risk of overexposing the highlights, especially when using transparency film. It is also very useful as a method of calculating the lightest and darkest part of a scene, allowing the photographer to bias exposures somewhere between, depending on subject matter, or the effect required.

Where backlit subjects are concerned, two or three spot metering points taken from slightly different areas of the subject bring out detail that would otherwise be lost in shadow. Atmosphere is also retained that may be lost if a flash was used.

When used in conjuction with portraits, I tend to take a spot measurement from the subject's face, one from the hair, and sometimes one from the background. The is gives a 2-1 bias in favor of the subject over the background. If the portrait is a bit more than head and shoulders i.e 3/4 length, I would add an additional metering point from the clothing.

Macro photography benefits too; I recall taking a picture of a Nasturtuim flower in my garden that had an ant sat inside it. I used three spot metering points; one each for the flower's light and dark tones, and one for the ant. The result showed some detail retained in the ant that would have otherwise been lost had I not factored it into the exposure.

I must admit, I only ever used all eight metering points when I first got my 4Ti many years ago. I found that when I did, I ended up with very average exposures for which I might have well just used the camera's centre weighted average metering.

I think it would be a particularly useful feature to add to one (ore more!) of the E-System bodies, as it would allow a superb method of controlling blown out highlights and a very creative way of adding atmosphere to images. I had my fingers crossed it would be included in the E-3, but alas, no.

As for lower centre weighted metering, I have not head of it; is it a form of centre weighted metering that is biased toward shadow? What camera's used it?

Cheers, Steve.

Yes, the metering system on the OM4Ti was truely remarkable. I particularly liked the "memory" option where you could lock in a multi-spot reading, to take as many frames as you wanted, bracketing around the locked in value as well if you wanted. I cannot understand why Oly has not kept this system for it's high end DSLRs.

Having said that, I must admit that multipattern metering with auto bracketing on my E510 covers most situations superbly.

John

HughofBardfield
15th April 2008, 10:51 AM
If enough people ask for multi-spot, maybe Oly will consider it. If you can implement multi-point AF, why not metering? I also used it a lot on my OM4, and while ESP is fine most of the time, it's precisely those problem shots where ESP falls down where it would be most useful.

Do any other manufacturers currently have such a system?

If the E520 is just around the corner, can we expect the E4 about this time next year???? DSLR product cycles seem to be about 18 months, but Oly seem to be shortening things a bit.

Wasn't "lower centre-weighted" a system where the centre weighted portion was somewhat pear-shaped to give extra weight to the foreground at the expense of the sky or something like that?:confused:

yorky
15th April 2008, 12:55 PM
I think the Minolta's used to have a system like that. I don't remember having much trouble with their exposures! I only had G3 but it was a belting camera, I just had a 28mm lens and a non minolta zoom. Shame the firm stopped. though Sony should have some good glass from them for their new dslr s.

Hiding_Pup
16th April 2008, 12:20 AM
The multi-spot metering is right here on my C-5050 - proof that it can be implemented into a digital camera so no excuses :-)