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View Full Version : Olympus Full-Frame who would have thought


WPJ
5th September 2010, 07:22 AM
How good would this be; if it's true. Full-frame and use of 4/3 lens!

http://www.43rumors.com/ft1-crazy-rumor-new-olympus-fullframe/

Paul

Zuiko
5th September 2010, 09:22 AM
Physically impossible - unless you want a circular image with black borders and corners.

Full frame from Olympus? I suppose it could happen - the day after hell freezes over and the last flying pig has left for Mars. BUT it would require a completely new lens range, existing Four Thirds lenses are simply incompatible.

Nice joke though, and some people might actually believe it. After all the word "gullible" has recently been removed from the dictionary. Someone should have saved this for April 1st! :D

dbutch
5th September 2010, 09:39 AM
Now if Olympus tied in with Leica and made a camera that could take the S series lenses at 30-40MP and the 4/3lenses at say 10MP that would be interesting, but no doubt pricey

Dave:D:rolleyes:

Zuiko
5th September 2010, 09:54 AM
Now if Olympus tied in with Leica and made a camera that could take the S series lenses at 30-40MP and the 4/3lenses at say 10MP that would be interesting, but no doubt pricey

Dave:D:rolleyes:

And competing with Leica in a very small market in which Leica have already established themselves? :rolleyes:

skyman1
6th September 2010, 10:33 AM
Now if Olympus tied in with Leica and made a camera that could take the S series lenses at 30-40MP and the 4/3lenses at say 10MP that would be interesting, but no doubt pricey

Dave:D:rolleyes:

sort of reminds me of my old Yashica 635 Twin Lens Reflex of the 70s it took 120 roll film(30-40MP) and 35mm(10MP) film got some really good pics with that :D then moved onto the OM1md lovely camera.

Greytop
6th September 2010, 11:10 AM
I take the view that it's best to sit tight and wait for an official release from Olympus. All these rumours are quite honestly nothing more than hot air.

With their track record of innovation I'm sure that they will have some surprises when we do finally know the true specification.
Until then (and a probably for a while after) I'm enjoying taking pictures with my E-30 :)

snaarman
6th September 2010, 11:17 AM
Here's a thought: If you fit the EC14 behind your zuiko, it expands the image and woopee, you get the effect of a longer lens. The spare light round the edges misses the sensor, but you didn't need it anyway.

What if you fitted the combo on your Canikon somehow: Would the larger image circle fill the larger sensor - just a thought ;)

Nick Temple-Fry
6th September 2010, 11:27 AM
Here's a thought: If you fit the EC14 behind your zuiko, it expands the image and woopee, you get the effect of a longer lens. The spare light round the edges misses the sensor, but you didn't need it anyway.

What if you fitted the combo on your Canikon somehow: Would the larger image circle fill the larger sensor - just a thought ;)

And if it was permanently (or at least semi-permanently fixed) you'd get rid of most of the risk of dust on the sensor, mirror, focus points etc.

Often wondered why SLR cameras insisted on having a hole in the front.

Nick

snaarman
6th September 2010, 11:53 AM
And if it was permanently (or at least semi-permanently fixed) you'd get rid of most of the risk of dust on the sensor, mirror, focus points etc.

Often wondered why SLR cameras insisted on having a hole in the front.

Nick

Hmm. Araldite, or a stiff elastic band.

I knew we would get there if we put our minds to it....

Zuiko
6th September 2010, 05:25 PM
And if it was permanently (or at least semi-permanently fixed) you'd get rid of most of the risk of dust on the sensor, mirror, focus points etc.

Often wondered why SLR cameras insisted on having a hole in the front.

Nick

Hmmm, but doesn't even the best teleconverter degrade the image? But the idea of protecting the sensor/miror is sound. Why does the IR filter have to go immediately in front of the sensor? Why not have it fitting on the lens mount, thus sealing the hole, then mount the lens in front. I think it was the Pentax 67 (or was it the RB67?) that had seperate inner and outer mounts - one for wides and standards and the other for certain telephotos. Maybe Oly could adopt the same principle. Not that Oly has a problem with dust, but it sure would make it easy to remove the IR filter when you want to shot IR!

Just a thought on sensor dust in general. I wonder why nobody has thought of dark frame subtraction to "remove" dust from the image in much the same way as it removes noise from long exposures. Instead of doing a kind of double exposure for each shot, just one dark frame subtraction should do every time the lens is changed - the sensor dust configuration isn't likely to change significantly whilst the lens is attached. Have I just invented the next great innovation? (Or am I just being a pr*tt? :o) :D

Nick Temple-Fry
6th September 2010, 05:37 PM
Hmmm, but doesn't even the best teleconverter degrade the image?

Just a thought on sensor dust in general. I wonder why nobody has thought of dark frame subtraction to "remove" dust from the image in much the same way as it removes noise from long exposures. Instead of doing a kind of double exposure for each shot, just one dark frame subtraction should do every time the lens is changed - the sensor dust configuration isn't likely to change significantly whilst the lens is attached. Have I just invented the next great innovation? (Or am I just being a pr*tt? :o) :D

Shouldn't it be 'white frame' difference addition John, with some way of generating a uniform white light into the optical system. As sensor dust spots show up as darker areas.

Actually the Olympus solution seems to work so well that we don't need that innovation. Yes I can find a couple of spots if I search hard at F22, but my camera has been in use since a couple of days after the E-3 was released in the UK without a sensor clean. Not really a major problem

Nick

Zuiko
6th September 2010, 06:07 PM
Shouldn't it be 'white frame' difference addition John, with some way of generating a uniform white light into the optical system. As sensor dust spots show up as darker areas.

Actually the Olympus solution seems to work so well that we don't need that innovation. Yes I can find a couple of spots if I search hard at F22, but my camera has been in use since a couple of days after the E-3 was released in the UK without a sensor clean. Not really a major problem

Nick

Quite right, Nick, it should be white frame. As we don't need it I might try to sell it to Canikon. :D