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hollyjack0142
22nd August 2010, 10:27 AM
I have just purchased an e620 a couple of weeks ago, and I dont seem to be getting the hang of getting snaps in low light situations!!

I have tried all the different settings, auto/manual focus etc etc, but when I press the shutter half way down, it will focus ok, then when I try to press all the way down to take the picture, nothing happens. It will then set the flash off a few times. It is very frustrating as I coudnt get any photos at the wedding i was at last night!!
Im using 14-42 and 40-150 lenses that came with the camera.

Should I be using different lenses?
Do I need an additional flash?

E-3
22nd August 2010, 10:31 AM
What did you have the ISO set at?

hollyjack0142
22nd August 2010, 10:35 AM
Hi,
I had it set to auto for most of my trials, then changed to the first 2 settings, which i beleive are 100 and something else.

theMusicMan
22nd August 2010, 11:03 AM
The flash firing off a few times is called pre-flash, and it is used in low light conditions (when flash is popped up) to focus on your subject. Once the pre-flash has found it's subject and focus is locked (you hear a beep if you have this enabled), the main flash will fire and a shot will be taken.

If you are using flash, you don't necessarily need to use a high ISO as the flash will compensate for the low light. However, if you're not using flash, then you will need to increase the ISO to get the required shutter speeds to be able to hand hold low-light photo's. The kit lenses, though very good and will perform adequately, are not best suited to low light conditions.

You could try manual focussing; you'll still hear the beep and see the focus confirmation in the viewfinder, but the pre-flash then won't need to be used and will fire as soon as you have focussed and the trigger is pressed.

How's that?

geirsan
22nd August 2010, 11:47 AM
Three suggestions:
1. Put your metering to spot metering. Makes a lot of difference.
2. Increase your ISO. My experience is that the ISO issue isn't a great problem because they way it comes out is quite pleasant to look at.
3. Consider investing in the Sigma 30mm f1.4 for low light photography. It rocks. Alternatively look for used OM-lenses with large aperture at eBay.

Don't be down on this. It comes as a surprise at first, but when you understand the workings here, you'll enjoy your camera a lot.

hollyjack0142
22nd August 2010, 12:11 PM
Thanks for your help, i will try this!

hollyjack0142
22nd August 2010, 12:12 PM
Thats great thanks for your help.

pepper
22nd August 2010, 12:37 PM
The pre flashing of the flash is the thing that annoys me most when using the camera in low light situations, so I ended up fixing it by using a separate Olympus FL36 flash, which uses infra red sensors to gain focus, its a lot more discreet but of course costs money and adds weight to the camera.

theMusicMan
22nd August 2010, 12:39 PM
The pre flashing of the flash is the thing that annoys me most when using the camera in low light situations, so I ended up fixing it by using a separate Olympus FL36 flash, which uses infra red sensors to gain focus, its a lot more discreet but of course costs money and adds weight to the camera.

... but yields 100% better results. The on-camera flash is awful - really. it gives harsh shadows and contrast, whereas the FL-36 or FL50 flash units allow far greater control and the results are far better.

pepper
22nd August 2010, 12:44 PM
Oh yes I'll second that!!!

It was the other reason I bought the fl36 too!:D

Jim Ford
22nd August 2010, 06:15 PM
If you get an Olympus flash, check out 'English Bob's' helpful instructions:

http://forum.43photo.com/showthread.php?t=19507

Jim